There’s no mistaking the distinct Cannage pattern on the Dior Charm bag introduced in Dior Men’s Summer 2024 collection where the motif is renewed in various fashion.

The answer: seemingly limitless. The Dior Men Charm bag is the latest of artistic director Kim Jones’ contemporary take on Dior’s storied heritage.

Familiar motifs have taken on new forms before. We saw how Jones supercharged renewed interest in the classic Saddle bag by reimagining it with a Matthew M Williams-designed buckle. Jones also introduced sneakers into the house’s design vocabulary by featuring either the Dior Oblique or in the case of the B30, a streamlined, sporty CD logo. This time, Jones has taken things up a few notches by combining two.

For a start, the Dior Charm bag features a clasp adapted from the hardware of the iconic Lady Dior in the house’s women’s universe. While the original motif consists of connected letters, D, I, O and R (of course), as mobile charms in a calculated arrangement, the Dior Charm of the men’s universe is rendered as a single plaque fashioned from the same characters, with the ‘O’ as the base. It sports an antique silver finish for a grittier look that distinguishes itself from that of the Lady Dior.

Dior Charm Crossbody bag, DIOR MEN
(JACKIE NICKERSON)

But the immediate defining characteristic of the Dior Charm bag is the Cannage motif that completely envelopes the piece. The Cannage Cosmo leather—first introduced by Jones in Summer 2023—is a slightly blown-up version of the original Cannage and translated as a whole laser-cut cage stitched onto smooth calfskin. A true testament to the skills of the Dior artisans, the topstitching is thoroughly precise and serves to enhance the encasement of the motif. In the Dior Charm’s grey and black iterations, they’re subtle and sleek; the Cannage is decidedly bold in the cognac colourway, especially against the antique silver-finish hardware.

Jones is no stranger to referencing the house’s women’s universe and transmuting these references into what would later become key motifs of Dior Men. The Dior Charm is one of those once-in-a-lifetime lightbulb moments that seem so obvious now that it’s been realised. Having it as part of a new bag like the aptly named Dior Charm bag and then combining it with an equally iconic motif like the Cannage (but once again, reworked) is genius.

(JACKIE NICKERSON)

The past is often revisited in luxury fashion, especially when a great deal of history and heritage are involved. But sometimes, the past whispers fresh ideas, and Jones is the reigning master of listening to them.

Harrington jacket, DIOR MEN
(ALFREDO PIOLA)

Artistic director Kim Jones’ continuous delving into the Dior archives has resulted in a Dior Men Summer 2024 collection that is an amalgamation of ideas of the house’s past creatives. From the tailoring silhouettes of Yves Saint Laurent to Gianfranco Ferré’s couture embroidery, the collection celebrates the archetypal masculine wardrobe and elevates them into something extravagant, yet reined with a spirited elegance.

Cardigan, polo, shorts, Saddle Soft bag and socks, DIOR MEN
(ALFREDO PIOLA)
Coat, jacket, shirt, beanie, brooches, Dior 3D S1I sunglasses and earring, DIOR MEN
(ALFREDO PIOLA)
Jacket, shirt, trousers, brooch, beanie, Dior 3D S1I sunglasses, freshwater pearl necklace, Dior Ultra Mini pouch, socks and Buffalo loafers, DIOR MEN.
Jacket, shirt, trousers, brooch, beanie, Dior 3D S1I sunglasses, freshwater pearl necklace, Dior Ultra Mini pouch, socks and Buffalo loafers, DIOR MEN
(ALFREDO PIOLA)

The show that never was. Celine Homme's cancelled Summer 2024 runway show (and its planned after-party with live performances) in July 2023—in light of the protests happening in Paris at the time—turned into a short film. Shot in the same month, it was largely filmed in Paris with interspersed scenes of classical ballet dancer Laurids Seidel shot at the Opéra Garnier Monte-Carlo.

An extended version of LCD Soundsystem's "Losing My Edge" is the soundtrack to the film, bringing the mirrored set to life as models embodying the collection's amplified androgyny walked on in succession. Artistic, creative and image director Hedi Slimane's aesthetic lies in the rock-and-roll androgyny synonymous with the legendary figures the likes of David Bowie and Mick Jagger. For Summer 2024 however, Slimane took it up a few notches with the adoption of more feminine elements that, quite frankly, Jagger could probably still rock right now.

At heart of the Celine Homme Summer 2024 collection's inspiration was Slimane's prior photography works in the early noughties. New York's underground art scene—featuring artists such as Dash Snow, Slater Bradley, Mathew Cerlett, Dan Colen, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Terence Koh and others—became the focus of an exhibition that Slimane curated in 2007 in Berlin. He later went on to stage his own in Amsterdam as tribute to the same artists. And as somewhat of a culmination of this continued love and tribute for the scene, Slimane also worked with Snow's estate to include artworks from his archive for the collection.

The fit: The standard Slimane look was apparent in Summer 2024. Impeccable tailoring finished off with skinny ties were nods to his Dior Homme era, but then elevated with rhinestones that seemed to give off their own luminescence with every movement. Leather was a heavy focus as seen with trousers crafted with a slight flare as well as some of the collection's standout moments. The latter saw the beautiful execution of a leather jacket with sleeves that ballooned out, inspired by 17th-century French court royalty.

The newness that Slimane injected into the collection (and let's face it, the man does what he wants and sometimes that equates to tried-and-tested looks) came in the form of more feminine nuances. Referencing couture constructions and silhouettes, bustiers took on exaggerated ribbon-like forms that wrapped around the waist, and in one look, a leather version was crafted with off-the-shoulder sleeves that seemed to levitate away from the body.

The details: As with most Slimane creations, there was a thoroughly nonchalant attitude about the collection. Sheer fabrications were dressed with rhinestones and sequins, with bare skin almost a given under leather outerwear and embellished cardigans. The same magpie-esque treatment was given to a number of heeled boots for that extra rock-and-roll flair.

Three exceptional looks: The opening look that consisted of a halter-neck top wrapped with satin a bow; look 36's disco-treated suiting; and look 47's billowy top that Harry Styles would certainly look at home in.

The takeaway: Slimane is not really a one-trick pony.

View some of the key looks from the Celine Homme Summer 2024 collection in the gallery below.

Robert Wun mimicking rain with crystals.

It’s amusing to read the comments on Gucci’s Instagram posts of new creative director Sabato de Sarno’s debut collection. People seem to fall into two camps: on one side are those who welcome the “return to elegance” with a comment going as far as calling the previous iteration of Gucci “a bad taste freak show”, while the other compares the current collection to that of a fast fashion brand and proclaims it “boring”.

It’s expected, of course. You can’t please everyone. Out of curiosity, I tried searching for Gucci’s posts of former creative director Alessandro Michele’s first collection, but all traces of the old Gucci appear to have been scrubbed from the feed. Anyway, I’m just certain that the reactions back then were just as divided.

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It’s funny because, as someone in the industry, I find that we’re quite detached from real-life consumer sentiments. Personally, I loved Michele’s maximalist Gucci. I found it creative, vibrant and presented a luxury fashion aesthetic that was different from its competitors. And evidently, it was an aesthetic that worked for a significant period until consumer fatigue set in—something that I truly didn’t experience.

But I get it. Consumer trends tend to be predictable and are linked to a number of socio-economic factors. There’s no denying that after a period of maximalist fashion, consumers are understandably tired of all the ostentatious more-is-more aesthetic, especially given that their personal economic situations may not be reflective of that aesthetic and thus, completely not relatable.

However, I wouldn’t go as far as to say that we’re living in an era of “quiet luxury”. Because the reality is (and this may sound elitist), if you’re adopting a quiet luxury aesthetic with anything other than brands like Loro Piana, Brunello Cucinelli and The Row, you’re not actually doing it right, I’m sorry to say. Anything else is minimalism; quiet luxury refers to more than mere simple, elevated cuts.

Change is constant and where fashion is concerned, it’s almost destined to move on to something on the other end of the spectrum once a trend cycle reaches the end. Although it is quite an oxymoron to say that maximalist fashion started getting stale, the complete opposite is a breath of fresh air from the visual assault of logos, prints, embellishments and the like.

A minimalist colour palette with a focus on cuts for the typically maximalist Valentino.

What we are currently experiencing can be compared to the rise of minimalist fashion circa 2009, when brands like Céline (the old, Phoebe Philo-led one), Calvin Klein and Jil Sander were constant points of references for impeccable style. They were stunningly clean, cut-focused and had little need for unnecessary flourishes, but ultimately suffered the fate of being rather easy to replicate using more affordable alternatives, without looking like a poorer version of the original. Now, attempt that with maximalist fashion and one runs the risk of looking downright tacky.

Of course, that’s not to say that there’s no space for maximalist fashion now—that would quickly erase the existence of quite a number of fashion brands across different categories. Brands whose DNA is maximalist would naturally tone down the visual language slightly or offer pieces that are more in line with current consumer tastes in order to not be alienated. But at the same time, not neglecting their individual identity.

We are already seeing the beginnings of neo-maximalism on the Spring/Summer 2024 runways.

The Barocco print appeared as pared back trims at Versace's Spring/Summer 2024 runway.
Minimalism the Versace way.

Italian fashion house Versace is unequivocally maximalist through and through. From gilded trims to its signature Barocco print, Versace’s oeuvre consists of a brilliantly excessive decadence that it has been famous for for decades. But for its Spring/Summer 2024 runway show, artistic director Donatella Versace showcased a collection that was a refreshing surprise. Clean lines took precedence over exaggerated silhouettes, and a more curated colour palette was favoured over brash combinations of bold colours. And yet, the Versace-ness remained as prints were rendered in monochromatic treatments that seemed to merge with their pastel base, and Barocco trims (albeit toned down) were done in white so as not to draw too much focus from the cut and make of the garments.

Similarly at Dolce&Gabbana: nary a single logo was seen anywhere throughout the 76-strong Spring/Summer 2024 menswear looks. It was a gradation of colours from black to taupe and then back to black with each look completely monochromatic from head to toe. True to the brand’s DNA, embellishments were still present in a number of looks, but done with restraint. Instead of combining multiple types of embellishments together, there was a more concerted effort to focus on a single type and done in one single hue—often in the same colour family as the rest of the outfit.

Now that that is sorted out, is maximalism done for now? Well, not quite. Homogeneity isn’t aninherently human trait. Think about it, the rise and existence of subcultures such as punks, mods and grunge, were all a result of wanting to break away from the mainstream. Even with minimalism gaining traction, there will still be individuals and fashion brands that choose to stick to their individual maximalist styles.

Dolce&Gabbana showed off restraint with its embellishments.

The thing about maximalism is that it’s often thought of as being more creative and more interesting as compared to minimalism. That’s not to say that minimalism is, inevitably, boring—it takes superior technical craft and skill to create something cuttingly simple. There is just a lot more to see on the surface with maximalist fashion. It’s something that we can never truly get tired of. We may require some respite after a while but we’ll always come back to awe-inspiring expressions of creativity from the very first glance.

He's a musician, an all-round performer, and a member of K-pop group GOT7—Mark Tuan is an entertainment force in his own right. But aside from his musicianship, the man has got style in spades, especially when paired with Saint Laurent. The two have developed a close relationship over the years with Tuan becoming a fixture on the front row of the Saint Laurent runway shows.

So who better to bring us to the most recent Saint Laurent Summer 2024 womenswear show by Anthony Vaccarello than Tuan himself? Follow along his journey to the show as he recalls his fondest moment with the fashion house as well as the thought process behind his choice of outfit for the show.

What goes through your mind when you’re getting ready for an average day in your life?

I approach each day with an open mindset, ready to adapt to whatever challenges or opportunities may arise. I don't stick rigidly to a fixed routine because I believe in spontaneity. So while I do have a general plan for the day, I'm always open to adjusting it if something unexpected and exciting comes my way. This approach allows me to stay flexible, embrace change, and make the most of every moment.

Why did you decide to go with this outfit for the Summer 2024 women’s show?

I decided to go with this outfit for the Summer 2024 women's show because it was an elegant look, and I simply connected with it. The design and style of the outfit resonated with my personal taste and aesthetic preferences. Fashion is not just about wearing clothes; it's also about expressing oneself and feeling a connection with what you wear. This particular ensemble not only exuded elegance but also made me feel confident and in tune with the theme of the show. It was a choice driven by both aesthetics and a personal sense of harmony with the attire.

You’re no stranger to being on the front row of fashion shows. What do you look out for when viewing a collection?

When I'm on the front row of fashion shows, there are two key elements I particularly look out for when viewing a collection: colour palettes and silhouettes. These two aspects play a crucial role in shaping the overall aesthetic and mood of a fashion collection.

You’ve also been to a number of Saint Laurent runway shows now. Is there a particular show or moment that still sticks to this day?

The Saint Laurent runway shows have consistently delivered memorable moments, but if I were to choose one that still sticks with me to this day, it would undoubtedly be the first show I attended. What made the experience truly unforgettable was the unexpected and breathtaking setting. I didn't expect to be sitting with the Eiffel Tower as the backdrop, so when the walls came down to reveal that iconic Parisian landmark, it was absolutely stunning.

If you could choose a song from your discography to be the track for a runway show, which would it be?

As of right now, I don't feel like any of my songs are suitable for a runway show, but perhaps in the future, I'll create music that perfectly complements the runway experience. Music plays a vital role in setting the mood and enhancing the overall atmosphere of a fashion show, and I would want to ensure that the song chosen aligns seamlessly with the designer's vision and the collection's theme. While my current discography may not have the right fit, I'm open to exploring and collaborating to create music that adds a distinctive and captivating element to future runway shows.

If I had to pick a clear standout from Milan for the Spring/Summer 2024 womenswear season (with a smattering of menswear in between), it would have to go to Bottega Veneta.

Creative director Matthieu Blazy has managed to create such a niche look for the Italian brand in terms of its ready-to-wear offerings—without the need for overt branding or the use of a singular colour—more than any of his predecessors have done before. The bags and accessories, of course, continue to utilise Bottega Veneta's signature Intrecciato techniques (as they should) but Blazy's emphasis on craft and techniques has offered a distinct point-of-view that has made his ready-to-wear pieces identifiable as Bottega Veneta creations.

"There is a need to reconnect to a primal world of animals, minerals, and plants. It’s like collecting seashells—beautiful, meaningful or meaningless. It’s linked to the beauty of small marvels and natural wonders. It’s embracing something freeform: these are clothes without codes," Blazy says in the collection notes.

For the Bottega Veneta Summer 2024 collection, Blazy once again took us on a journey—one that crossed oceans and continents. Craft was the central connecting thread as culture-specific influences the world over were referenced and mashed together to create pieces that were (mostly) wearable and imbued with extreme technicalities. Yes, this meant that visually, the collection may not have appeared cohesive due to the many different techniques, colours and silhouettes that were employed throughout. The cohesiveness came through conceptually with summer- and beach-inspired ideas of craft apparent in a number of looks.

The fit: There's no singular look to the Bottega Veneta Summer 2024 collection. It was a transition of different moments in time and space—as though Blazy meant to showcase the Bottega Veneta man as one who's worldly and of many different leanings. The show opened with a knit swimwear look that looked as though it was stripped from the '20s (and perhaps one of the few menswear looks that felt wearable for the warmer climes). Although it's difficult to decipher accurately based on images and the runway video alone, I'm fairly certain that Blazy showed a number of his brilliant leather trompe l'œil looks where seemingly everyday pieces were actually crafted from leathers, and paired with leather ties.

What's technically impressive were the knit looks this season. Blazy had shown off a number of knit looks in the past few collections but they seemed to be amped up for Summer 2024 with even more flourishes and done in greater scale. Chunky jumpers and tanks were beautiful, crafted to perfection in complicated patterns but without a homespun quality. These were intended to look high-quality and luxurious—done by hand, yes, but with the precision of skilled, experienced craftsmen.

The details: Things got bigger in the bags department. The Bottega Veneta Summer 2024 bags were supersized such that they'd make pretty decent travelling companions. A massive duffle bag in croc (look 7) was half the size of the model that carried it, while the Sardines in Intrecciato took on their biggest iteration yet with the metallic handle offering an even better grip thanks to the upsized design.

Three exceptional looks: Look 11 and its deliciously chunky knit that enveloped almost the entirety of the ensemble under it; look 53's coordinated look consisting of a shirt and trousers with faggoting and jagged hems; and look 41's updated proposal of a tank-and-trouser fit.

The takeaway: I don't know who's rich enough to purchase Bottega Veneta ready-to-wear, but you'd definitely recognise the look right off the bat.

View the full Bottega Veneta Summer 2024 runway collection in the gallery below.

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Versace is typically not one to quickly hop onto trends or care much about the shifts in consumer tastes. It marches to its own beat—coming up with a new-ish monogram, La Greca, only in 2021 (well after other brands) but relatively sticking to its signature Barocco prints, Medusa logo, and sexually charged designs.

It's surprising then that for Spring/Summer 2024, Donatella Versace decided to do a 180 with a collection that's representative of a return to minimalism—or that often misused phrase, "quiet luxury"—but done the Versace way. To be fair, this wasn't the first instance of Donatella going rogue with a rather minimalist collection. This is, however, perhaps her most successful execution yet.

The fit: The show opened with luxurious duchess silks adorned with the Versace Contrasto Checkerboard—a pattern that debuted in Spring/Summer 1982—in varying sizes and later paired with utilitarian pieces the likes of a perfectly cut trench and multi-pocketed gilet. They were simply teasers of what's to come: a skilful combination of tailoring and Versace motifs rendered in pastel hues.

The checked and square motifs continued on in multiple fabrications including wool crepe tweed. In some instances, checkerboard prints were layered with signature Barocco prints as well as a Versace Rose motif but in quite muted monochromatic renderings such that they weren't fighting for attention.

The focus on cut and tailoring were evident for the Versace Spring/Summer 2024 collection. Lines were sharp and clean with nipped in waists and three-dimensional sculptural shoulder moments that elevated the level of craft and construction further. In look 69 (the most minimal menswear look of the lot) for example, an impeccably tailored jacket with flared trousers showcased the peak of Versace tailoring but at the same time exuded a timeless aesthetic. It's highly edited and pared back, yes; yet the Versace man still exudes a sexy confidence.

The details: There's no denying that there were semblances of Miu Miu and Prada stylings—it's difficult to not reference the of-the-moment combinations, especially when taking on a minimalist approach. But again, Donatella made them her own. The peeking of underwear under trousers, scoop-neck tanks and fine gauge knit cardigans (both interpreted with gorgeous macramé Barocco borders) were reworked codes of Versace sensuality.

There were hints of a feminine-masculine tension that skewed in neither direction yet showed that the Versace man wouldn't be fazed even if it did. He's that confident.

Three exceptional looks: Look 12's maroon leather suit that's a stunning showcase of leather tailoring; the pastel blue mod-tailoring in look 23 with that clever styling of unbuttoning the last few buttons to show a hint of skin and underwear; and look 73's excellent tailoring.

The takeaway: This is how you do timeless, elegant minimalism while evolving house codes without looking like the next Zara collection.

View the full Versace Spring/Summer 2024 runway collection in the gallery below.

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There was no doubt that Burberry chief creative officer Daniel Lee's first showing for the British brand was a stark departure from predecessor Riccardo Tisci's.

The debut—a collection that we're finally able to experience in boutiques now—was a return to Burberry's Britishness, replete with elements and motifs ripped from Lee's lived experiences as a Brit as well as from the brand's archives. The Burberry check was rendered at a slant and blown up (a simple but effective way of modernising the brand signifier) and the Equestrian Knight Design (EKD) revived as a complementary branding device.

For the Burberry Summer 2024 collection, Lee continued to reimagine the brand's heritage with an even more focused lens. Building a new visual vocabulary for a brand like Burberry is no mean feat. With the second runway collection, we're starting to see the fruits of that labour.

If the Winter 2024 collection was a foundational collection that at times may have seemed a bit chaotic—a mallard beanie and a cacophony of visuals ranging from roses to more mallards to the EKD—the Summer 2024 collection felt more intentional and evolved. Surprisingly, the latter was more subdued and less colourful than the debut. In fact, the 'knight blue' that Lee has adopted for Burberry was little to be seen on the runway.

The fit: The overall colour palette for the collection was relatively quite dark. Instead of knight blue, colours graduated from black to a dark green before branching off to richer hues.

Yet, at the same time, prints were a key focus of the collection. What appeared as though vintage scarf prints lifted from the Burberry archives were actually prints of metal hardware in the shape of a horse—part of the Knight bag introduced for Winter 2023—and chains. Similarly, a repeated motif of the clasp of the Rocking Horse bag too appeared as a print. Both prints adorned a number of ready-to-wear pieces, including a new take on the classic Burberry trench. Lee's intent was to reimagine the trench for the summer and that included making it more lightweight than ever—in look 47, the trench could be seen hung by the neck simply by a thin chain.

What I especially liked about Burberry Summer 2024 was how Lee doubled down on the brand's military past. And while that could have resulted in quite costume-y creations, the ready-to-wear looked simply at home. Epaulettes on shirting as well as outerwear extended well beyond the shoulder line, while the trench coats cut a sharp, regimental silhouette while still retaining a sense of modernity with a dropped waist and exaggerated belt.

The details: Lee may have kept the tailoring sharp but he injected off-kilter semblances in the styling as well as accessories. The collection's slip-ons for example (looks 41 and 45) were doused in rhinestones with the EKD fixed like one would a Crocs Jibbitz. Leather loafers were crafted with an extended leather buckle in the shape of the Burberry Shield bag and topped with the EKD. It's these constant details that help drive the message of the new subtle visual vocabulary of Lee's Burberry.

Three exceptional looks: The ease and simplicity of look 16's black fit embellished with cleverly printed trousers; look 23's printed coordinates that could easily be broken up into pieces that could stand on their own; and look 45's new take of dressed up casual in classic Christopher Bailey-era hues.

The takeaway: Burberry is back to being refined with doses of unexpected quirks—a truly Brit aesthetic.

View the full Burberry Summer 2024 runway collection in the gallery below.

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Photo by Loewe

The towering fountains by American artist Lynda Benglis weren't the only elements from the Loewe spring/summer 2024 menswear show that stood out on the runway. The moment the first model walked out—decked out in a completely crystallised look—it was certain that we were about to witness a show.

Although, if one was expecting nonplussed theatrics, it wasn't exactly that kind of a show. Sure, there were highly conceptual pieces peppered in between the 51-look collection—a number of tops fashioned as blown-up swatches of jacquard fabrics each complete with a dress pin, for example—but creative director Jonathan Anderson's work has been revolving around subtle theatrics of late.

As with the past couple of seasons, the Loewe spring/summer 2024 menswear collection was a focus on materiality set against familiar wardrobe staples. It was particularly a study of challenging perceptions; that the ordinary could be extraordinary by just a slight tweak. Crystal-embellished pieces were a common sight on denim and a slew of accessories from sunglasses to round-toe footwear. They dressed up what would've been classic striped shirts, jumpers, polos, and blazers.

Photo by Loewe

Footwear merged ready-to-wear in a number of looks, blurring the lines between accessory and clothing. On the collection's leather jumpsuits—crafted in quite minimal fashion—hems quite seamlessly joined crepe soles.

The fit: Proportions were skewed in almost every look. Trousers were made to sit incredibly high on the waist—at least slightly above the belly button. The intent was to elongate legs, while at the same time, compressing the torso with tops intentionally tucked in, and in some cases, cropped to accommodate the distorted silhouette.

There was a sense of simplicity being not exactly that simple. Asymmetric cuts on knitwear drove the point of subtle-tweaking to achieve new forms, while still keeping to a relatively easy-to-wear colour palette.

Photo by Loewe
Photo by Loewe

The details: Anderson introduced the Loewe Pebble bucket bag. The name refers to the pebble-shaped Anagram-engraved hardware that acts as the bag strap's length adjuster. Available in suede and leather, the strap allows it to be both carried as a tote as well as comfortably draped across the body.

The collection's series of sunglasses echoed the glittery treatments that were key throughout. But unlike the ready-to-wear and a selection of bags and shoes, these were speckled with crystals instead of being completely drenched in them—perfect for anyone looking to make a relatively quieter statement.

Three exceptional looks: Look 10 may be a bit out there (and may not even be reproduced commercially) but captured multiple elements of the collection perfectly; look 16's glittery shirt and denim combination was easily the best of the lot; and look 47 that displayed Loewe's leather mastery.

The takeaway: It's always about proportions, even when you don't have the body of a model.

View the full Loewe spring/summer 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

Photo by Hermès

It's not that there's nothing sexy about Hermès; there's nothing explicitly or brashly so about the storied luxury house. For spring/summer 2024, longtime artistic director Véronique Nichanian pushed the limits of what we know of Hermès with a play on summer sensuality by way of layered contrasts and lots of skin.

There's an architectural element to the spring/summer 2024 menswear collection that's reflected in the staging of the show. Nichanian intended the clothes to act as architecture, from which the body became the foundation.

Models appeared from behind openwork screens resembling the graph-like fabrics that ran rampant throughout the collection. Lightweight—and at times, translucent—fabrications were layered atop of each while modestly revealing skin, especially in the collection's lighter hues.

But what was the most surprising element of the show were the shorts. Nichanian opted for shorts with inseams that couldn't be longer than five inches. It's quite possibly the shortest that Hermès has ever gone when it comes to the length of shorts. It's hardly anything to complain about given the heatwave we've been experiencing, but for Hermès, it's quite a big deal.

The fit: With the short shorts, the revealing of skin was still done tastefully—the Hermès way. The shorts were crafted from a range of cotton blends as well as technical fabrics. They were designed with elasticated waistbands that still featured belt loops for an elevated look and for the added style option of wearing one with a belt (or two as they're styled).

The entire spring/summer 2024 menswear collection felt free in a sense that nothing felt constricted. Silhouettes consisted of roomy cut shirts and blousons with trousers that range from slim- (but not excessively so) to wide-cut that were all elasticised at the waist.

Photo by Hermès
Photo by Hermès
Photo by Hermès

The details: The opening look included a Haut à Courroies bag that was treated as though it's been weathered out in the sun. A slight imprint of the bag's lock, clochette as well as its flaps were done in a subtle tonal variation—a beautiful rendition to a classic icon.

The collection's double étrivière belts—essentially fitted with buckles that resemble stirrups—were some of the more inspired elements in the collection. They're connected in the middle by a chain that added some edge, and recalls the more punk-esque autumn/winter 2023 menswear collection presented earlier this year.

Photo by Hermès

Three exceptional looks: Look 6's easy, summer fit that featured the collection's shorts as well as a crinkled blazer topped off with a roped tote bag; look 25's option of layering pretty much the same outfit as in look 6, with a deliciously oversized shortened parka; and look 46's knit-layering masterclass.

The takeaway: Showing off skin tastefully is an art.

View the full Hermès spring/summer 2024 collection in the gallery below.

Look 1. Photo by Hermès
Look 2. Photo by Hermès
Look 3. Photo by Hermès
Look 4. Photo by Hermès
Look 5. Photo by Hermès
Look 6. Photo by Hermès
Look 7. Photo by Hermès
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Look 25. Photo by Hermès
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Look 30. Photo by Hermès
Look 31. Photo by Hermès
Look 32. Photo by Hermès
Look 33. Photo by Hermès
Look 34. Photo by Hermès
Look 35. Photo by Hermès
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Look 37. Photo by Hermès
Look 38. Photo by Hermès
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Look 40. Photo by Hermès
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Look 42. Photo by Hermès
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Look 44. Photo by Hermès
Look 45. Photo by Hermès
Look 46. Photo by Hermès
Look 47. Photo by Hermès
Look 48. Photo by Hermès
Look 49. Photo by Hermès
Look 50. Photo by Hermès
Photo by Dior Men

It would have been easy to make his fifth anniversary as artistic director of Dior Men all about him. And it would've been justifiable too, seeing how Kim Jones has continuously crafted collection after collection of menswear offerings while tapping into Dior's archives and haute couture sensibilities. Jones' inclination to collaborate with other brands, designers, and artists have also helped widened Dior Men's reach.

Yet, the Dior Men spring/summer 2024 collection was far from an ego trip.

True to form, Jones once again referenced Dior's storied history. "Dior is an haute couture house: it is all about the clothes. At the heart of Dior is silhouette, shape, technique and fabrication of the very highest order," says Jones in the collection notes. "It's a culture we have inherited from womenswear past and applied to menswear present. And for the first time in our collections, it is a collage of influences from different Dior predecessors and eras we wanted to pay tribute to at once—together with some of our own. All are connected through texture and technique alongside some of the Dior pop icons, particularly the Cannage."

The show's staging seemed to suggest—on his fifth anniversary no less; a feat that not many can claim in fashion nowadays—that Jones was leaving it all out in the open. The entirety of the collection's 51 looks ascended from below the tiled floor and models stood waiting for their turn to walk along the grid's perimeter. There was no pretence in the spring/summer 2024 collection—no surprises, just well executed designs that cemented the Dior Men canon he's crafted five years ago.

The fit: Jones referenced a quartet of the house's former creative heads for the Dior Men spring/summer 2024 collection. Yves Saint Laurent's silhouettes were the guiding principle in the collection's look, particularly in the effortless, sweeping tailoring brought about by trousers cropped slightly above the ankles and at times designed with pleats for added volume. The collection's defining piece, the cardigan, was casually draped over shoulders in multiple variations of Cannage tweeds, Gianfranco Ferré-inspired ornate embellishments as well as dripping cabochons—the latter a Monsieur Dior nod.

Marc Bohan's play of textures informed the tactile elements of the collection. Tweed was the main vehicle used across a variety of pieces, expanding its use from just the traditional. It was seen on everything from summer-appropriate vests to all manner of the collection's bags and accessories, especially the iconic Saddle.

The details: Loafers—tweed or otherwise—were stamped with a new circular Dior logo derived from the Lady Dior hardware. The logo appeared as buckles on a number of bags too. Sandwich bags crafted in a selection of the collection's key fabrications would most likely be the novelty accessory of the season, and was most beautifully executed in supple leather decorated with the Cannage motif. The eye-catching beanies seen on a number of models, incorporated ronghua right in the centre. These velvet flowers were crafted by master craftsmen in the trade who worked closely with the Dior ateliers.

Three exceptional looks: Look 7's stunning Cannage tweed coat in signature Dior grey and paired with a pop of bold colour in the form of a beanie; the tailoring in look 31 that incorporated a bowtie appliqué on a pocket of the three-buttoned blazer; and the closing look 51 that was dripping with cabochons paired with high-fluo pink.

The takeaway: Who needs a collaboration when the past offers so much inspiration and content to remix for the now?

View the full Dior Men spring/summer 2024 collection in the gallery below.

Look 1. Photo by Dior Men
Look 2. Photo by Dior Men
Look 3. Photo by Dior Men
Look 4. Photo by Dior Men
Look 5. Photo by Dior Men
Look 6. Photo by Dior Men
Look 7. Photo by Dior Men
Look 8. Photo by Dior Men
Look 9. Photo by Dior Men
Look 10. Photo by Dior Men
Look 11. Photo by Dior Men
Look 12. Photo by Dior Men
Look 13. Photo by Dior Men
Look 14. Photo by Dior Men
Look 15. Photo by Dior Men
Look 16. Photo by Dior Men
Look 17. Photo by Dior Men
Look 18. Photo by Dior Men
Look 19. Photo by Dior Men
Look 20. Photo by Dior Men
Look 21. Photo by Dior Men
Look 22. Photo by Dior Men
Look 23. Photo by Dior Men
Look 24. Photo by Dior Men
Look 25. Photo by Dior Men
Look 26. Photo by Dior Men
Look 27. Photo by Dior Men
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Look 29. Photo by Dior Men
Look 30. Photo by Dior Men
Look 31. Photo by Dior Men
Look 32. Photo by Dior Men
Look 33. Photo by Dior Men
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Look 35. Photo by Dior Men
Look 36. Photo by Dior Men
Look 37. Photo by Dior Men
Look 38. Photo by Dior Men
Look 39. Photo by Dior Men
Look 40. Photo by Dior Men
Look 41. Photo by Dior Men
Look 42. Photo by Dior Men
Look 43. Photo by Dior Men
Look 44. Photo by Dior Men
Look 45. Photo by Dior Men
Look 46. Photo by Dior Men
Look 47. Photo by Dior Men
Look 48. Photo by Dior Men
Look 49. Photo by Dior Men
Look 50. Photo by Dior Men
Look 51. Photo by Dior Men
Photo by Dior Men

It was five years ago that artistic director Kim Jones presented his very first runway collection for Dior Men. The collection marked a turning point for the house's menswear universe with Jones adapting Christian Dior's women-centric creations and haute couture techniques for men. And of course, it heralded a time of collaborations with partners outside of the realm of fashion.

The Dior Men spring/summer 2024 runway show marks the fifth-year anniversary of Jone at the house. Offering a teaser into what the collection could look like, the house invited Australian actor Felix Mallard—of Netflix's Ginny & Georgia fame—into some of the archival inspirations that Jones were taken by. Cabochon jewellery as well as tweed, for example, look to be key elements of the collection.

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If Jones is looking to emulate the kind of collaborative successes that he's introduced for Dior Men since the beginning of his tenure, we may also see one for spring/summer 2024.

Watch the Dior Men spring/summer 2024 runway show here live from Paris Fashion Week Men's.

What: Dior Men spring/summer 2024 runway show
Where: Paris, France
When: Friday, 23 June 2023 at 9pm Singapore time

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