Givenchy

The fit: The Givenchy Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear show was an intimate one. Held salon-style at its Parisian headquarters, the collection was designed by the Givenchy studio—Matthew M. Williams' final collection was for Pre-Autumn 2024. To be honest, even without the hand of a known creative director, the Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection felt a lot more refined with just enough injections of playful modern nuances.

The entire collection was based on founder Hubert de Givenchy's personal wardrobe with elements that he had a penchant for. The use of the colour sapphire, for example, was adopted because de Givenchy adored it as a replacement for black, while cut up armholes of outerwear were an ode to his penchant for capes. Tailoring was central to the collection—although trousers could have done with a little bit of length adjustments but I'm just nitpicking—with suits and tailored outerwear making up a bulk of the collection. And in true Givenchy style, the shoulders were strong and cutting.

The details: Fun came with the way that an archival cat motif was incorporated into some of the looks. It was done tongue-in-cheek as a oversized parka that featured a number of the cat faces seemingly drowning in their own fur, and in another, the fur took on the form of a shearling jacket-cape hybrid. In look 18, it became a mini shearling crossbody that was paired with a tank featuring the print.

What was quite a stunner, especially up close, was the closing look's jacket. Beautifully ornate, the jacket was a reminder of the kind of craftsmanship that the design studio is capable of, and one that had been sorely missed on the runways.

Three exceptional looks: Look 2's interpretation of the studio's blouse blanche as a workwear staple; the double cardigan styling of look 13; and the closing look.

The takeaway: Not all luxury fashion houses need to infuse some semblance of streetwear into their designs.

View the full Givenchy Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Sean Suen

The fit: Within the realm of menswear tailoring, the structures and limits are palpable, owing to the time-honoured techniques of not only constructing a suit, but also in the idea of tailoring as a garment of authority. Chinese designer Sean Suen recognises this. His eponymous label's Autumn/Winter 2024 collection—and also, pretty much his entire repertoire thus far—tapped on the conventions of tailoring by referencing the period where Western tailoring began being adopted by the East.

There's an undeniably rebellious take on tailoring, and I'm not even talking about the one look where the model revealed some derrière. Traditional menswear silhouettes were deconstructed before being spliced together, creating asymmetrical shapes that formed beautiful drapes. At the heart of it was a '50s-led reference with wide ties and geometric prints indicative of the period.

The details: While the tailoring was, in every sense, contemporary, Suen included mandarin-collared suiting. But of course, they were also rendered in more contemporary styles—the first outing saw elongated sleeves with an oversized bodice with equally oversized patch pockets.

On a number of looks, Suen piled on the waistbands. On a number of occasions, they took on the appearance of a visible ribbed knit layer (akin to that play of visible boxer waistbands) while others were more literal interpretations of a double layer of trouser waistbands.

Three exceptional looks: Look 2 and its spliced collar and draped asymmetry; the obvious old-school reference of look 11 but made fresh; and the regality of look 27 that had tie bars used as lapel pins.

The takeaway: There are always ways to move around the preconceived confines of menswear, and Sean Suen is becoming quite a master at it.

View the full Sean Suen Autumn/Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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Dries Van Noten

The fit: Dries Van Noten can do no wrong in my eyes. There's consistency in his design aesthetic—you can definitely tell a Dries Van Noten piece even with the brand steering away from obvious logos and branding—but Papa Dries offers something new every season.

For Autumn/Winter 2024, the man known for his play with prints and proportions, kicked things off with a string of dark tailored looks. Each felt different and at times disjointed from the one before—yet that was the unifying narrative. The collection was a play in the unexpected and of juxtaposition. There was no telling what the next look would be as he moved from a cuttingly tailored suit worn almost rock-and-roll-like with a fringed, long scarf, to a deconstructed jumper worn over a languid, long coat.

As the darks became increasingly punctuated by textures and infusions of muted colours, Papa Dries revealed a sudden spate of his signature prints and colour-blocking. But at the same time, they remained washed and pared back in intensity.

The details: There was a studied use of garments in non-traditional ways. Jumpers were worn either unzipped from the side or completely cropped with zippered hems. Leather was used as mock-neck tops, while shirting and a number of jackets were fastened with brooches and pins for a rakish drape that was simply sublime. Long opera-like gloves took on many different forms and added edge to some of the simplest tailoring and combinations in the collection.

But at the end of it all, everything was wearable—a key Dries Van Noten element.

Three exceptional looks: Look 9 that I honestly wanted to wear right there and then off the runway; look 24's brilliant use of textures and draping; and look 53 that's a combination of both.

The takeaway: Whatever Papa Dries has been doing to keep his creativity constantly fresh yet consistent, I want it.

View the full Dries Van Noten Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Kenzo

The fit: Kenzo was my last show for day four of Paris Fashion Week Men's and after a rather exhausting day, it personally wasn't as exciting as it ought to be in the moment. The venue was spectacular, however. Held at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, the space offered a brilliant backdrop for an Autumn/Winter 2024 collection themed around the cross-cultural exchange of the origins of the fictional universe of the Star Wars franchise.

Thankfully, artistic director Nigo opted to not be literal with the inspiration—there weren't obvious nods to the films nor were there prints done in collaboration with the franchise. But rather, he chose to incorporate the Asian influences of the Star Wars lore and references into the silhouettes. Outerwear had semblances of sci-fi with knot fastenings adorning the front.

The details: The silhouettes may not have been severe or fashion-forward, but the prints added some punch to the entire collection. A woven pattern inspired by Japanese hikeshi-banten fireman's jackets appeared on everything from suits to workwear, while a number of different tiger motifs were rendered in jacquards and embroideries.

Three exceptional looks: Look 6's more extravagant coords that featured the collection's more standout motif; look 30's streamlined tailoring; and look 50 that felt more Kenzo by Nigo.

The takeaway: Elevated and streamlined, yes. But where's the fun?

View the full Kenzo Autumn/Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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The look—that pretty much sums up the Giorgio Armani's latest menswear outing during Milan Fashion Week Men's. The staging for the show was intimate with two separate timings (this style director might have misread his invite and turned up for the wrong time slot) and with almost zero information given. And up till now, there's no official collection notes for the Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection.

The reason? Mr Armani wants the reactions and reviews to be organic points-of-view untainted by his personal intentions behind the collection. And quite honestly, that's a rarity. And also a beautiful thing, because as a fashion journalist/writer/editor you're then left to give an opinion based solely on what's seen and experienced.

So here it goes...

The fit: From the very first moment that the opening look came onto the runway, there's no denying that it's a Giorgio Armani creation. The ease and fluidity of the suit was an Armani classic, but tweaked. The shoulders were dropped ever so slightly, with the bodice cut oversized. The effect was a decidedly oversized fit done with intent such that the model still looked well-proportioned instead of seemingly swimming in fabric.

The idea ran throughout the Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection. Classic menswear suiting fabrications—herringbone, Prince of Wales checks, houndstooth—were reimagined in roomier cuts and their patterns manipulated just enough for an update. They're paired with signature Giorgio Armani geometric motifs set against a relatively muted palette of favourites the likes of blacks, greys, and navies, but at times, with a flash of bright hues to keep things interesting.

The details: There's not much in the accessories department to speak off (Giorgio Armani isn't exactly an accessories house) but the small pouches with braided straps in the more technical ski-ready portion of the collection looked like a steady combination of form and function.

We do however, need to talk about the styling. A number of the looks had trouser hems stuffed into boots, which is hardly a groundbreaking idea but served to further emphasise the cut and airiness of the fabrics used, even with the seemingly thicker wools.

Three exceptional looks: Look 4's somewhat mismatched combination that looks irreverently cool; the coordinate in look 23 that's simple but beautifully executed; and look 31's lapel-less suiting.

The takeaway: If it ain't broke, don't fix it—or maybe just a tad.

View some of the Giorgio Armani Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Unlike most other brands, Hermès always does things a little differently. While it's become common practice for brands to furnish fashion editors and journalists with a list of celebrities who will be attending their shows (we've sadly all become glorified paparazzis), Hermès does nothing of the sort. In fact, I attempted to press the Hermès Singapore team multiple times so that I can be prepared for who to look out for before the Hermès Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear show for soundbites and general content, but they maintained that they themselves had no clue.

But there they were. A sizeable number of celebrities—both established and up-and-coming—entered the Palais d'Iena to a runway show audience that was mingling with pre-show drinks in hand. James Marsden walked in wearing a suit over a white turtleneck. And from the corner of my eye, in an outfit from Hermès' Spring/Summer 2022 menswear collection, was Swedish singer-actor Omar Rudberg of Young Royals—he paired the look expertly with a statement Hermès necklace and a bag with matching hardware. Queer Eye's Antoni Porowski rocked up in a shearling jacket with leather details, young Danish actors Alex Høgh Andersen and Lucas Lynggaard Tønnesen (known for Vikings and 1899 respectively) arrived together, The White Lotus' Leo Woodall was there too, and so was Luka Sabbat. I'm sure I've missed out a number of other celebrities but Hermès was very low-key about it.

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The younger famous faces at the front row perhaps seemed like a calculated move. Does a venerable brand like Hermès need the awareness of a younger generation? Arguably, every brand could. Yet, the very spirit of the House is one that's irreverently playful and artistic director Véronique Nichanian has always channeled that into every collection. If anything, the appearance of these young faces could further help communicate the true nature of Hermès, one that's even more apparent in its Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection.

The fit: Right off the bat, it felt like as though the Hermès Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection was inspired by a rather British sensibility with the use of Prince of Wales checks and argyle knits. The styling seemed to have carried over some of the influences of the punk-inspired Autumn/Winter 2023 menswear collection. Yet, the overarching theme of the collection was simply one of versatility and paradox. The merging of traditional menswear with non-traditional fabrications, timeless motifs rendered anew, and a decidedly contemporary take on the familiar.

It was evident from the trousers in the collection. They were cut slimmer than ever while tops remained oversized. Jackets (a number of them reversible) were slightly cropped, but not too much—just enough to be a modern update. The argyle motifs were spliced and reconstructed with other colours and patterns, while waterproof gum canvas were cut into functional layers with its translucent nature affording multiple ways of styling and wear. Layering was a focus with sleeveless elements (a definite buy for this side of the equator) either worn on their own or layered over a multitude of other lighter layers.

The highlight for me though were the calfskin ensembles that were paraded towards the end. I initially thought that they were ponyhair pieces owed to the incredible sheen, but at the collection's re-see the very next day, it was revealed that they were polished calfskin. Fashioned into a number of outerwear, suiting and even a stunning vest, they were beautiful examples of Hermès craftsmanship and that spirit of playfulness.

The details: Nichanian has a knack for styling every facet from the Hermès menswear universe into one cohesive look without ever making it feel too much. Jewellery for Autumn/Winter 2024 were simple and effective. A personal favourite were the pebble-shaped necklaces in palladium and wrapped with a bit of leather for a chic statement that doesn't shout. Silk scarves turned into snoods with a reversible plain leather side, and ties echoed the Prince of Wales check suiting but rendered in fine topstitching.

But of course, the bags were what I'm certain everyone had their eyes on. I adored the Hermès Équipier pouches that were designed to fit comfortably on bicycle bars and fitted with multiple zipped compartments. The Fouree-Tout Étrivère—essentially an oversized holdall—was crafted with a sturdy top panel where its top handle is attached to while the bottom half is made of more supple leather that gave it a beautiful shape when carried using its shoulder strap. And the classic Haut à Courroies was given an appliqué treatment with leathers of different finishes for a more rugged appeal.

Three exceptional looks: Look 11's play on layers that's especially visible thanks to the gum canvas turtleneck; Look 34's simple monochromatic ensemble of a leather jacket with slim-cut trousers; and the closing look that should be worn to an awards show pretty soon.

The takeaway: You don't need to design wide-cut trousers to be relevant and cool; a contemporary aesthetic is more than just about being trendy.

View the full Hermès Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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It was almost a given that the Dior Men Winter 2024 collection would once again be artistic director Kim Jones' homage to the storied history and archives of the House. Jones' continued reverence for the House has undoubtedly created some of the most inspiring contemporary pieces of late. And the fact that he's able to do so season after season, displays just how extensive the Dior archive is—there are still so many stories to discover and rediscover. Jones is helping to tell those stories.

For Winter 2024, Jones focused on the relationship between Dior and ballet, specifically Margot Fonteyn and Monsieur Dior, and by extension, the former's dance partner, Rudolf Nureyev. In a surprising happenstance, Jones' uncle—photographer and former ballet dancer Colin Jones—too had a link to Nureyev, having photographed the legend and developed a friendship with him. The Winter 2024 collection was thus fashioned as a complete wardrobe of a dancer's life, both onstage and off—channelled through Nureyev's life.

And if you think theatricality was left only in the clothes (including a Dior Men haute couture finale debut), you'd be sorely mistaken. Jones has been dabbling with the runway show theatrics of late. Summer 2024's show saw models ascending from the ground; Winter 2024 saw models ascending to the starry sky of the showspace in a stirring finale that in some ways, reminded me of the staging of one of the rooms in La Galarie Dior.

The fit: Tailoring was sharp and languid all the same—once again taking inspiration from Yves Saint Laurent's definitive silhouette for the House. But for Winter 2024, I'd like to focus on how the collection felt like it's made ready for travel. The collection consisted more of separate pieces than specifically designed coordinates, meaning that everything could be easily spliced and remixed together, reflecting the malleability of a dancer's off-duty wardrobe. Just grab a few pieces and one would essentially look pretty put together.

There's an apparent '70s vibe to the entire collection, marked by the simplicity of the shapes and the lack of excessive details (especially in the beginning looks). Fastenings too were designed to be easy—zips were rampant throughout the entire collection on everything from coats to rompers to deep-V cardigans.

The details: Ballet slippers were interpreted as Mary Jane loafers in a multitude of colours. One that stood out the most on the runway for me was one rendered in an electric blue, paired almost casually with a more grounding brown outfit (look 19). There were also more obvious interpretations of ballet slippers as well as slip-ons thrown in the mix.

Cannage bags were crafted from silk-like material, giving off a sheen that looked luxurious even from the elevated seating I was put at. They came in the form of camera as well as bum bags that added a utilitarian juxtaposition to the ready-to-wear's more elegant designs. One particular bag that immediately caught my eye was a backpack (look 47) embroidered with a somewhat blown-up toile de Jouy motif and paired with a top done in the same treatment. Beautiful.

While this collection felt more commercial and simplified than perhaps the Summer 2024 collection, the details were still aplenty, especially in the couture offerings. Embroidered collars and waists took on intricate forms, enveloping the circumference of where they're positioned and encasing the body with armour-like protection.

Three exceptional looks: Look 4's unassuming romper paired with a turban (inspired by a 1999 Stephen Jones creation for Dior womenswear) and mustard socks; the scrumptious oversized brown coat worn with leather trousers for a monochromatic fit in look 21; and the divine jewelled mastery of look 50 that also combined elements of Jones' interpretation of Dior Men that I personally gravitate towards.

The takeaway: A brilliant way of gaining inspiration from ballet without forcefully injecting tutus and skirts and all that stereotypical ilk.

View the full Dior Men Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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New patina colours for the season.

"Consistency" could mean different things to different people. For some, it's akin to playing it safe with no actual point-of-view to speak of; others take it to mean being true to one's spirit and key aesthetics. Berluti falls in the latter—a shoemaking brand that has expanded over the decades to offer a more holistic luxury experience.

That's not to say that Berluti is only skilled at shoemaking (it is, of course). But throughout its course of creative directorship changes—Haider Ackermann as artistic director was a personal favourite—it has proven that there's a lot to work with as extensions of its sharp footwear. Berluti is decidedly rudderless but the design team is crafting innovative pieces that works for a lifestyle worthy of the quality of its craftsmanship and pieces.

It's evident from the presentation space for the Berluti Autumn/Winter 2024 collection. Located in a historical house with all the typical flourishes of a luxurious Parisian apartment, it was easy to imagine that the collection could very well belong to the owner of the lavish four-room suite.

The Rapiecé Reprisé collection is marked by its oversized stitching of patinated and Scritto leathers together.

The space opened up with an installation of Berluti's new Venezia leather patina colours for the season, displayed on the classics the likes of the Alessandro and the Andy. To the left was a room of the season's ready-to-wear offerings worn by a cluster of mannequins, each completely styled from head-to-toe. And facing that was the return of the Rapiecé Reprisé collection—first created in 2005—as the first instalment of the Berluti Editions line of a limited edition proposal of savoir-faire pieces.

The fit: Workwear was enhanced for Berluti Autumn/Winter 2024. A denim-like coordinate looked and felt somewhat like denim but was expertly crafted from a combination of cotton and silk, making it lighter than traditional denim with the strength of its weave intact. Leather and suede jackets take on lightweight constructions too. Opting to enhance the detailing of the pieces, a suede jacket in a gorgeous shade of burnt orange was decorated with pleats near the placket with pockets left slim and close to the body. Textural accents were also key as topstitched elements were employed quite tastefully and the use of smooth leather on the collar, the underside of which featured the Scritto—a hidden detail that Berluti loves to add almost in every iteration.

Functionality is always key and Berluti offered up some. A shearling jacket for example, was designed with a removable shearling collar—attached by snap buttons—for a second option on how it can be worn. And also, effectively switching up the vibe of the complete outfit. It's not exactly new perhaps, but smart nonetheless.

Suiting too was made with a function-first approach in mind. While Berluti's bespoke service is the brand's heightened form of tailoring on offer, the Autumn/Winter 2024 collection approached tailoring in a more lifestyle-driven manner. They're made for travel and thus are crafted from incredibly soft and lightweight Loro Piana cashmere. The idea is that these travel suiting pieces need little to no steaming—pop one on right out of the luggage and you can be on your way without looking worse for wear.

The details: A new sneaker was introduced. Fitted with a Vibram sole, the Sky Running sneaker echoes familiar silhouettes of trail-running sneakers. But also, it also felt to me like an amalgamation of some of the elements of Berluti sneakers past. The Sky Running sneakers will be offered in three different colourways with each consisting of a patchwork of mixed materials, including a heel counter that's crafted out of a patinated material meant to resemble Berluti's renowned Venezia leather patina.

There were also a duo of square-toed footwear called the Grand Chemin that's crafted from nubuck. In its deck shoe version, it resembled a cross between a formal dress shoe with that of a deck shoe collar. The trekking boots iteration featured a knit ribbed upper rendered in the same colour as the rest of its parts.

Three exceptional looks: The aforementioned "denim"-on-"denim" look 10; look 13's combination of a more rugged (yet rather minimal) suede jacket with key menswear staples (peep also that massive cabas); and look 18's simple proposal that highlights the Sky Running in all its glory.

The takeaway: Clothes that you'd actually wear with shoes crafted with centuries of craftsmanship expertise—consistency isn't necessarily a bad thing, folks.

View the full Berluti Autumn/Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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While writing this review, "Good People" by Mumford & Sons and Pharrell Williams is playing on Spotify. Ever since the song was played as part of Louis Vuitton's Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear runway show soundtrack, it's been stuck in my head ever since. A stirring rhythm made perfect by Mumford & Sons' signature musicality, it was one of four original songs Williams worked together with other musicians to amplify the mood of the show. "Good People" is the only one that has been released on streaming platforms.

Lest we forget, multi-hyphenate Williams has had an accomplished music career for decades now. As a producer, he was responsible for some of the greatest, most addictive hits—from Usher's "U Don't Have to Call" to Camila Cabello's "Havana". Williams knows that the music is just as important as the collection walking down the runway. "Good People"'s country-esque undertones and marching beat felt rousing as models walked fast in the makeshift showspace right next to Fondation Louis Vuitton.

And just like how he'd collaborated with a number of artists for the soundtrack, the Louis Vuitton Autumn/Winter 2024 collection was also an amalgamation of many different cultures and aspects of his home state of Virginia. The overarching Americana-themed collection saw plenty of cowboy-inspired looks with American Western motifs and silhouettes running rampant throughout. They were added with touches by both the Dakota and Lakota nations—not only in the accessories, but also the staging of the show and soundtrack.

The collaborations didn't stop there. The runway show debuted a collaboration with American brand Timberland. Some of the work boots were housed within clear plexiglass and Monogram canvas Louis Vuitton trunks carried by models like prized possessions—these are set to be limited editions. There were a few iterations of the Timberland x Louis Vuitton collaborations and they're crafted by the team at Louis Vuitton's Italian ateliers.

The role of a creative director is more than just about designing. It's about bringing together multiple ideas, streamlining them, at times editing them, and ensuring that everything feels cohesive. Williams has had decades of practice albeit not as long within the fashion realm, but the man clearly knows his stuff. And this third outing with the maison proves it.

The fit: Part-cowboy and part-American workwear, the entire Louis Vuitton Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection were essentially reworked updates on classic American Western tropes. Tailoring—a segment that Williams has excelled in with Louis Vuitton—made use of boot-cuts and flares with a bodice that was proportionally slim. When they were not rendered in variations of the camouflage Monogram, they were decorated with fine embellishments and at times, Dakota flower motifs in stunning placements.

While some looks may border on the side of being a tad too costume-y, the entire collection felt more like contemporary reimaginings of American Western clichés designed to be wearable and elevated. Cowboy buckle belts for example, were branded with Vuitton in the maison's signature scripts with other versions displaying a more craft-centric approach. And the styling too was quite enjoyable to see as these classic tropes came together in all their warm, dessert-like hues.

The details: It'd be remiss of me to talk about a Louis Vuitton collection without mentioning the bags. The classic Steamer was reintroduced in three sizes, including a massive 65-cm silhouette that was hard to miss out on as it made its way down the runway. The massive Steamer could easily fit a cabin-sized luggage inside of it. There were Speedy affixed with gems and others designed in new forms, including a studded saddle version.

What caught my eyes the most were the worn out treatment of the Monogram canvas. Rendered to look as though the bags themselves have been baked in the sun for a long time, creating a beautiful light patina along the sides.

Three exceptional looks: Look 13's play on the flamboyant nuances of American Western ensembles, with a flared trim around the torso; everything about look 28 from the all-white suit with abstract prints and contrasted with that bold, in-your-face Speedy; and the closing look of a leather Monogram suiting crafted to perfection.

The takeaway: Louis Vuitton may have indeed found the right person to continue to evolve Louis Vuitton into more than just a luxury fashion brand.

View the full Louis Vuitton Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Save for the spotlights on a hill of cashmere fibres positioned in the middle of the Zegna Autumn/Winter 2024 showspace and for a moment, the A-list front row—as one should when it’s a gathering of Mads Mikkelsen, Michael Fassbender, Lucas Bravo and more in one long front row—everything else was dark.

The cashmere hill (in Zegna’s signature vicuña colour) felt like a divine altar, amplified by a soundscape of whirling winds. As soon as the show began to the tunes composed by James Blake, even more fibres seemingly dropped from the sky. The Oasi Cashmere fibres—the brand’s fully traceable cashmere—were the centrepiece of the collection. For artistic director Alessandro Sartori, it was a form of servitude both to the luxurious material as well as to the luxury fashion community at large—a facet of sustainability that was promised and eventually achieved.

The fit: The framework that had been set hasn’t deviated. Sartori’s consistent intent in crafting a timeless wardrobe of nouveau tailoring presented itself in brilliant hues that once again exemplified how well he understands the effect of colour in a collection. The blacks in the Zegna Autumn/Winter 2024 collection weren’t just blacks that faded into the background of the space, they fell somewhere in between black and a deep grey with tonal differences, if any, highly unnoticeable. The same went for the whites that ran along the spectrum and transitioned gradually into an egg wash hue.

Layering was the key intent as a form of individual expression. And even at a glance, it was strikingly apparent that every single piece could very well be stripped and from their individual looks and remixed in different permutations.

There’s a sense of lightness evident even with the most layered of looks—I counted four visible layers on one. The outerwear were light enough such that they moved with relative ease as the models walked by, even when they were decked out with multiple oversized pockets. Equally plush-looking yet breezy were the trousers that were cut wide as always and designed with a single fixed pleat on each side.

The details: The stars had to be the knit tops for Zegna’s Autumn/Winter 2024 collection. They ranged from super sleek drop-shouldered turtlenecks to iterations with flocked designs. One particular detail stood out, especially during the post-show inspections. Look 20’s version of the same opening knit had trompe l’œil ribbing that appeared as though they were burned into the material but were in fact an effect resulted from combining a different-coloured fibre as well as tight knitting of the ends together for a more robust hem foundation. The same effect was also applied onto the trousers paired with each corresponding top.

And if you’re looking for gloves to add to your winter wardrobe, look no further than the ones offered by the collection. Crafted longer than typical gloves, they pooled stylishly for that always desirable element of sprezzatura.

Three exceptional looks: Look 5's simply sublime monochromatic combination with beautifully constructed lines; a bit of blush melange suiting with pockets deep enough that you wouldn't even need a bag; and look 45's multi-layered approach that's an excellent example of genius layering.

The takeaway: Quiet consistency with injections of newness is the way to go. Because why invest in a piece from a new collection if it’s unable to seamlessly integrate as part of a complete wardrobe from others by the same brand?

View the full Zegna Autumn/Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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It was a visual overload at Prada’s Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear runway show.

For starters, the entire showspace had once again been completely reimagined from the previous Spring/Summer 2024 shows. We were stepping into an elevated glass platform and beneath it was a riverbed landscape of greens, rocks and pebbles, and at certain sections, flowing water. Chairs that seemed to be positioned rather haphazardly (but of course they weren’t) were typical rollers you’d find in an office setting—these became the show seats and might I add, pretty comfortable too.

And of course, the number of international celebrities that were greeted with screaming fans as they made their way into Fondazione Prada. Newly appointed Prada ambassadors Kelvin Harrison Jr. and Troye Sivan were there, as did a host of other fellow ambassadors such as Jake Gyllenhaal, Kentaro Sakaguchi and Win Metawin, as well as Korean stars Karina of Aespa and Lee Jae-wook. To say that it was chaotic in the showspace as editors gathered for sound bites and content would be an understatement.

But at the end of it all, it was really about the clothes and Prada hardly ever disappoints. As both the invite and showspace teased, co-creative directors Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons explored the traditional confines of office wear and simply turn them on their heads for a collection that was rebellious and youthful in nature.

The fit: The tie became sort of the centre of the entire collection, a symbol of that rigid connotations in an office setting. Nothing was altered when it came to the tie but its symbolic attribute was what pretty much tied the entire collection together.

Standard office dress codes were designed with skewed proportions. Suiting consisted of oversized blazers with slightly nipped-in waists and exaggerated lapels, as well as trousers that were worn low on the hips with signature Prada slim cut. And if you were expecting colours that corporate Joe would be at home in, you’d be sorely mistaken. Bold hues permeated throughout the collection with knit cardigans, jumpers and textured leggings—beautifully constructed that you wouldn't even notice a single seam—and those knit swim caps. There were no explanation for the latter but I gather if you're already one foot out the door in a corporate setting, you'd want to take the chance to head to the pool any chance you get, winter or not.

Oversized coats were consistent standouts (we all know how both Mrs Prada and Simons love their coats) especially when the inspiration transitioned from office uniforms to more public service types. Military- and navy-inspired outerwear were crafted in a number of materials and looked especially killer when they were individually worn and distressed by hand.

The details: Back to the trousers for a bit. Upon closer inspection, in place of waistbands, trousers were sewn together with leather belts. That's right: there's no longer any excuses not to wear a belt with your formal trousers. The belts came in a number of iterations too—from more classic colours and widths to the more extravagant woven ones that reached up to a width of 9cm.

The belts were also applied on to the bags. Re-Nylon backpacks and messenger bags came with the same range of leather belts for multiple ways of carrying each piece. A clear favourite was a backpack in washed navy with worn out details applied to every leather trim for a stunning distressed effect.

Three exceptional looks: Look 19's super cool reworking of the trench; look 36's oversized military coat that I now have on my wish list; and Prada's take on the Canadian tuxedo in look 45.

The takeaway: This is for all of us who'd escape the confines of a 9 to 5 in a heartbeat; and if that's not possible, at least the fashion channels the feeling.

View some of the key looks from the Prada Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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It was one of the colder nights in Milan this entire Milan Fashion Week Men's and serendipitously, it was as though Giorgio Armani himself summoned the cold. Because right at the Armani/Teatro, the Emporio Armani Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection took centrestage. A makeshift lighthouse sat at the very end of the theatre space, while the floors filled with a light-play resembling waves.

When the space turned dark, it was then that the lighthouse lit up. And with it, the collection was revealed—like a gathering of ships making their way to the same destination where the Emporio Armani man and his decadent lifestyle belong.

The fit: The inspiration was clear from the very start. A military-inspired coat hung broad and oversized on the shoulders and on the model's head, a sailor hat stylised and trimmed in white. Then came more literal interpretations of all things nautical—from Breton stripe-esque jumpers to sailor collars branded with Emporio Armani at the back. And they're all swathed in navy too, both a nod to the inspiration as well as an iconic Emporio Armani hue.

Then it transitioned to the collection's ski offerings drenched in stark white with puffers and ski trousers designed with embossed lines. The nautical references were pared back as the collection transitioned into its more formal pieces. Classic Armani tailoring—that unmistakably languid and roomy construction—was topped off with scarf ties and delicate draping that recalled calm waves.

The details: The collection's footwear grounded each look. Chunky and almost heavily constructed, one of the standouts included calf-high boots crafted with supple uppers that pooled to create beautiful, naturally set draping. They looked like reimagined wellies, if you will.

What immediately took my breath away was the use of embroidery. Even from where I sat, the embellishments looked exceptionally executed. They resembled coral with a range of starburst shapes and colours, and employed on a number of denim as well as wool coats—the juxtaposition worked really well.

Three exceptional looks: Look 8's multi-layered outerwear was a stunning execution of form and function; the many details apparent in look 24 that requires multiple examinations; and look 92's sparkly overshirt that's an update on an Armani classic.

The takeaway: Even approaching his 70th birthday, Giorgio Armani's steely resolve on his design aesthetic and style still hasn't waned.

View the full Emporio Armani Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Dolce&Gabbana

The fit: Elegance was the assignment at Dolce&Gabbana. One of the opening looks was a full black ensemble consisting of a high-neck-collared blouse cut oversized and paired with slim trousers. It was a fine example of the Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection title: Sleek.

While “sleek” could mean a simplification and the stripping off of excess and unnecessary flourishes, Dolce&Gabbana opted for refinement and elegance.

Sleekness was apparent across the entire collection with black taking prominence. But like most designers, black was the foundation where textural play and tasteful embellishments helped to further refine the looks. Even in a number of the opening looks, black sheens and shines differentiated the components of each outfit, whether they’re subtly done or not.

There was also no stopping the brand from executing exaggerated forms and show-stopping looks. A plush fur coat, for example, wouldn’t necessarily be thought of as “sleek” (although I’m sure the feel of it would be absolutely divine) but again, sleek in the sense that it’s a restrained Dolce&Gabbana where the focus of that particular piece was the grandeur of it with no added details. And trust me, the brand knows how to go over-the-top.

The details: Like many of the brands that have shown a this far, Autumn/Winter 2024 is set to be one where sparkle and shine reign supreme. At Dolce&Gabbana, they’re done sparingly with a standout look included a blazer completely riddled with rhinestones worn over a scoop-neck tank done in the exact same way—sleek. On the tailoring front, suits were cut with slightly cropped blazers (at times with tailcoats) reminiscent of what a conductor would wear, worn with pussy bows blouses (a Dolce&Gabbana classic). Prints and lace too were incorporated in a number of looks—styled either as a quiet statement or paired with pieces of the same make such that the entire look is rather homogenous.

Three exceptional looks: Look 19's super clean and minimal take on a biker jacket that still retains an element of cool; the peacoat in look 34 cut at just the right length and beautifully paired with riding boots; and look 53's take on formal eveningwear—one I'd wear right now.

The takeaway: Even Dolce&Gabbana is adhering to a quieter (I mean, sleeker) fashion movement. But how long will the brand stick to it?

View the full Dolce&Gabbana Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Fendi

The fit: Something’s happening with Silvia Venturini Fendi. The artistic director has become quite a rebel of late—a perfectly good thing, in my opinion. What first started as a shocking Spring/Summer 2022 collection that involved severely cropped blazers and tops with waist chains, has continued on with other deviations from traditional menswear.

For Autumn/Winter 2024, Silvia once again subverted menswear codes by incorporating nuances of typically womenswear tropes. What I initially thought was a pencil skirt (the collection’s standout piece made its appearance in the very first look) was actually a pair of berms cut to resemble on—an incredibly low crotch joined inches above the hem. The flow of these skirt-berms—inspired by the spirit of the Scottish kilt—too were deceptive enough to warrant that initial impression.

In a further defiant move, Silvia paired these hybrids with fine gauge knits before layering over coats made for the outdoors. At some glances, the looks appeared somewhat granny-like and eccentric but somehow, cool all the same as Silvia merged the outdoors with the more refined pieces underneath them.

But of course, there were plenty of looks that didn't make use of the hybrids and they weren't lacking any fashion-forward fervour. Tank tops were layered over polos, cardigans were fastened with a single brooch, and tops designed with extended hems.

The details: Pillow-like bags were crafted from quilted leather or shearling, adding to the tactile comfort that they exuded. The Peekaboo and Baguette bags were mainstays; this time they were interpreted with shearling and in some cases, appeared to be slashed to reveal a hidden pop of colour (they're a collaboration with MAD Architects' Ma Yansong). But perhaps, the most talked about accessory at the Fendi Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear show was the collaboration with Devialet. The handheld portable speaker was already teased moments before the show as Italian rapper Lazza got out of his vehicle with one and a song was played. Let's just say, the sound quality and volume were pretty impressive and something that could be held on your palm.

Three exceptional looks: The simplicity of look 5 with its fitted polo and cardigan in deeply rich autumnal colours; look 39's somewhat collegiate look but elevated with a delicious blue coat; and the closing look consisting of a metallic yarn polo worn with pleated kilt hybrid.

The takeaway: Too afraid to wear a skirt in public? Start with a Fendi skirt-berms hybrid.

View the full Fendi Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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