The look—that pretty much sums up the Giorgio Armani's latest menswear outing during Milan Fashion Week Men's. The staging for the show was intimate with two separate timings (this style director might have misread his invite and turned up for the wrong time slot) and with almost zero information given. And up till now, there's no official collection notes for the Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection.

The reason? Mr Armani wants the reactions and reviews to be organic points-of-view untainted by his personal intentions behind the collection. And quite honestly, that's a rarity. And also a beautiful thing, because as a fashion journalist/writer/editor you're then left to give an opinion based solely on what's seen and experienced.

So here it goes...

The fit: From the very first moment that the opening look came onto the runway, there's no denying that it's a Giorgio Armani creation. The ease and fluidity of the suit was an Armani classic, but tweaked. The shoulders were dropped ever so slightly, with the bodice cut oversized. The effect was a decidedly oversized fit done with intent such that the model still looked well-proportioned instead of seemingly swimming in fabric.

The idea ran throughout the Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection. Classic menswear suiting fabrications—herringbone, Prince of Wales checks, houndstooth—were reimagined in roomier cuts and their patterns manipulated just enough for an update. They're paired with signature Giorgio Armani geometric motifs set against a relatively muted palette of favourites the likes of blacks, greys, and navies, but at times, with a flash of bright hues to keep things interesting.

The details: There's not much in the accessories department to speak off (Giorgio Armani isn't exactly an accessories house) but the small pouches with braided straps in the more technical ski-ready portion of the collection looked like a steady combination of form and function.

We do however, need to talk about the styling. A number of the looks had trouser hems stuffed into boots, which is hardly a groundbreaking idea but served to further emphasise the cut and airiness of the fabrics used, even with the seemingly thicker wools.

Three exceptional looks: Look 4's somewhat mismatched combination that looks irreverently cool; the coordinate in look 23 that's simple but beautifully executed; and look 31's lapel-less suiting.

The takeaway: If it ain't broke, don't fix it—or maybe just a tad.

View some of the Giorgio Armani Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Save for the spotlights on a hill of cashmere fibres positioned in the middle of the Zegna Autumn/Winter 2024 showspace and for a moment, the A-list front row—as one should when it’s a gathering of Mads Mikkelsen, Michael Fassbender, Lucas Bravo and more in one long front row—everything else was dark.

The cashmere hill (in Zegna’s signature vicuña colour) felt like a divine altar, amplified by a soundscape of whirling winds. As soon as the show began to the tunes composed by James Blake, even more fibres seemingly dropped from the sky. The Oasi Cashmere fibres—the brand’s fully traceable cashmere—were the centrepiece of the collection. For artistic director Alessandro Sartori, it was a form of servitude both to the luxurious material as well as to the luxury fashion community at large—a facet of sustainability that was promised and eventually achieved.

The fit: The framework that had been set hasn’t deviated. Sartori’s consistent intent in crafting a timeless wardrobe of nouveau tailoring presented itself in brilliant hues that once again exemplified how well he understands the effect of colour in a collection. The blacks in the Zegna Autumn/Winter 2024 collection weren’t just blacks that faded into the background of the space, they fell somewhere in between black and a deep grey with tonal differences, if any, highly unnoticeable. The same went for the whites that ran along the spectrum and transitioned gradually into an egg wash hue.

Layering was the key intent as a form of individual expression. And even at a glance, it was strikingly apparent that every single piece could very well be stripped and from their individual looks and remixed in different permutations.

There’s a sense of lightness evident even with the most layered of looks—I counted four visible layers on one. The outerwear were light enough such that they moved with relative ease as the models walked by, even when they were decked out with multiple oversized pockets. Equally plush-looking yet breezy were the trousers that were cut wide as always and designed with a single fixed pleat on each side.

The details: The stars had to be the knit tops for Zegna’s Autumn/Winter 2024 collection. They ranged from super sleek drop-shouldered turtlenecks to iterations with flocked designs. One particular detail stood out, especially during the post-show inspections. Look 20’s version of the same opening knit had trompe l’œil ribbing that appeared as though they were burned into the material but were in fact an effect resulted from combining a different-coloured fibre as well as tight knitting of the ends together for a more robust hem foundation. The same effect was also applied onto the trousers paired with each corresponding top.

And if you’re looking for gloves to add to your winter wardrobe, look no further than the ones offered by the collection. Crafted longer than typical gloves, they pooled stylishly for that always desirable element of sprezzatura.

Three exceptional looks: Look 5's simply sublime monochromatic combination with beautifully constructed lines; a bit of blush melange suiting with pockets deep enough that you wouldn't even need a bag; and look 45's multi-layered approach that's an excellent example of genius layering.

The takeaway: Quiet consistency with injections of newness is the way to go. Because why invest in a piece from a new collection if it’s unable to seamlessly integrate as part of a complete wardrobe from others by the same brand?

View the full Zegna Autumn/Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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It was a visual overload at Prada’s Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear runway show.

For starters, the entire showspace had once again been completely reimagined from the previous Spring/Summer 2024 shows. We were stepping into an elevated glass platform and beneath it was a riverbed landscape of greens, rocks and pebbles, and at certain sections, flowing water. Chairs that seemed to be positioned rather haphazardly (but of course they weren’t) were typical rollers you’d find in an office setting—these became the show seats and might I add, pretty comfortable too.

And of course, the number of international celebrities that were greeted with screaming fans as they made their way into Fondazione Prada. Newly appointed Prada ambassadors Kelvin Harrison Jr. and Troye Sivan were there, as did a host of other fellow ambassadors such as Jake Gyllenhaal, Kentaro Sakaguchi and Win Metawin, as well as Korean stars Karina of Aespa and Lee Jae-wook. To say that it was chaotic in the showspace as editors gathered for sound bites and content would be an understatement.

But at the end of it all, it was really about the clothes and Prada hardly ever disappoints. As both the invite and showspace teased, co-creative directors Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons explored the traditional confines of office wear and simply turn them on their heads for a collection that was rebellious and youthful in nature.

The fit: The tie became sort of the centre of the entire collection, a symbol of that rigid connotations in an office setting. Nothing was altered when it came to the tie but its symbolic attribute was what pretty much tied the entire collection together.

Standard office dress codes were designed with skewed proportions. Suiting consisted of oversized blazers with slightly nipped-in waists and exaggerated lapels, as well as trousers that were worn low on the hips with signature Prada slim cut. And if you were expecting colours that corporate Joe would be at home in, you’d be sorely mistaken. Bold hues permeated throughout the collection with knit cardigans, jumpers and textured leggings—beautifully constructed that you wouldn't even notice a single seam—and those knit swim caps. There were no explanation for the latter but I gather if you're already one foot out the door in a corporate setting, you'd want to take the chance to head to the pool any chance you get, winter or not.

Oversized coats were consistent standouts (we all know how both Mrs Prada and Simons love their coats) especially when the inspiration transitioned from office uniforms to more public service types. Military- and navy-inspired outerwear were crafted in a number of materials and looked especially killer when they were individually worn and distressed by hand.

The details: Back to the trousers for a bit. Upon closer inspection, in place of waistbands, trousers were sewn together with leather belts. That's right: there's no longer any excuses not to wear a belt with your formal trousers. The belts came in a number of iterations too—from more classic colours and widths to the more extravagant woven ones that reached up to a width of 9cm.

The belts were also applied on to the bags. Re-Nylon backpacks and messenger bags came with the same range of leather belts for multiple ways of carrying each piece. A clear favourite was a backpack in washed navy with worn out details applied to every leather trim for a stunning distressed effect.

Three exceptional looks: Look 19's super cool reworking of the trench; look 36's oversized military coat that I now have on my wish list; and Prada's take on the Canadian tuxedo in look 45.

The takeaway: This is for all of us who'd escape the confines of a 9 to 5 in a heartbeat; and if that's not possible, at least the fashion channels the feeling.

View some of the key looks from the Prada Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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It was one of the colder nights in Milan this entire Milan Fashion Week Men's and serendipitously, it was as though Giorgio Armani himself summoned the cold. Because right at the Armani/Teatro, the Emporio Armani Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection took centrestage. A makeshift lighthouse sat at the very end of the theatre space, while the floors filled with a light-play resembling waves.

When the space turned dark, it was then that the lighthouse lit up. And with it, the collection was revealed—like a gathering of ships making their way to the same destination where the Emporio Armani man and his decadent lifestyle belong.

The fit: The inspiration was clear from the very start. A military-inspired coat hung broad and oversized on the shoulders and on the model's head, a sailor hat stylised and trimmed in white. Then came more literal interpretations of all things nautical—from Breton stripe-esque jumpers to sailor collars branded with Emporio Armani at the back. And they're all swathed in navy too, both a nod to the inspiration as well as an iconic Emporio Armani hue.

Then it transitioned to the collection's ski offerings drenched in stark white with puffers and ski trousers designed with embossed lines. The nautical references were pared back as the collection transitioned into its more formal pieces. Classic Armani tailoring—that unmistakably languid and roomy construction—was topped off with scarf ties and delicate draping that recalled calm waves.

The details: The collection's footwear grounded each look. Chunky and almost heavily constructed, one of the standouts included calf-high boots crafted with supple uppers that pooled to create beautiful, naturally set draping. They looked like reimagined wellies, if you will.

What immediately took my breath away was the use of embroidery. Even from where I sat, the embellishments looked exceptionally executed. They resembled coral with a range of starburst shapes and colours, and employed on a number of denim as well as wool coats—the juxtaposition worked really well.

Three exceptional looks: Look 8's multi-layered outerwear was a stunning execution of form and function; the many details apparent in look 24 that requires multiple examinations; and look 92's sparkly overshirt that's an update on an Armani classic.

The takeaway: Even approaching his 70th birthday, Giorgio Armani's steely resolve on his design aesthetic and style still hasn't waned.

View the full Emporio Armani Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Dolce&Gabbana

The fit: Elegance was the assignment at Dolce&Gabbana. One of the opening looks was a full black ensemble consisting of a high-neck-collared blouse cut oversized and paired with slim trousers. It was a fine example of the Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection title: Sleek.

While “sleek” could mean a simplification and the stripping off of excess and unnecessary flourishes, Dolce&Gabbana opted for refinement and elegance.

Sleekness was apparent across the entire collection with black taking prominence. But like most designers, black was the foundation where textural play and tasteful embellishments helped to further refine the looks. Even in a number of the opening looks, black sheens and shines differentiated the components of each outfit, whether they’re subtly done or not.

There was also no stopping the brand from executing exaggerated forms and show-stopping looks. A plush fur coat, for example, wouldn’t necessarily be thought of as “sleek” (although I’m sure the feel of it would be absolutely divine) but again, sleek in the sense that it’s a restrained Dolce&Gabbana where the focus of that particular piece was the grandeur of it with no added details. And trust me, the brand knows how to go over-the-top.

The details: Like many of the brands that have shown a this far, Autumn/Winter 2024 is set to be one where sparkle and shine reign supreme. At Dolce&Gabbana, they’re done sparingly with a standout look included a blazer completely riddled with rhinestones worn over a scoop-neck tank done in the exact same way—sleek. On the tailoring front, suits were cut with slightly cropped blazers (at times with tailcoats) reminiscent of what a conductor would wear, worn with pussy bows blouses (a Dolce&Gabbana classic). Prints and lace too were incorporated in a number of looks—styled either as a quiet statement or paired with pieces of the same make such that the entire look is rather homogenous.

Three exceptional looks: Look 19's super clean and minimal take on a biker jacket that still retains an element of cool; the peacoat in look 34 cut at just the right length and beautifully paired with riding boots; and look 53's take on formal eveningwear—one I'd wear right now.

The takeaway: Even Dolce&Gabbana is adhering to a quieter (I mean, sleeker) fashion movement. But how long will the brand stick to it?

View the full Dolce&Gabbana Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Fendi

The fit: Something’s happening with Silvia Venturini Fendi. The artistic director has become quite a rebel of late—a perfectly good thing, in my opinion. What first started as a shocking Spring/Summer 2022 collection that involved severely cropped blazers and tops with waist chains, has continued on with other deviations from traditional menswear.

For Autumn/Winter 2024, Silvia once again subverted menswear codes by incorporating nuances of typically womenswear tropes. What I initially thought was a pencil skirt (the collection’s standout piece made its appearance in the very first look) was actually a pair of berms cut to resemble on—an incredibly low crotch joined inches above the hem. The flow of these skirt-berms—inspired by the spirit of the Scottish kilt—too were deceptive enough to warrant that initial impression.

In a further defiant move, Silvia paired these hybrids with fine gauge knits before layering over coats made for the outdoors. At some glances, the looks appeared somewhat granny-like and eccentric but somehow, cool all the same as Silvia merged the outdoors with the more refined pieces underneath them.

But of course, there were plenty of looks that didn't make use of the hybrids and they weren't lacking any fashion-forward fervour. Tank tops were layered over polos, cardigans were fastened with a single brooch, and tops designed with extended hems.

The details: Pillow-like bags were crafted from quilted leather or shearling, adding to the tactile comfort that they exuded. The Peekaboo and Baguette bags were mainstays; this time they were interpreted with shearling and in some cases, appeared to be slashed to reveal a hidden pop of colour (they're a collaboration with MAD Architects' Ma Yansong). But perhaps, the most talked about accessory at the Fendi Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear show was the collaboration with Devialet. The handheld portable speaker was already teased moments before the show as Italian rapper Lazza got out of his vehicle with one and a song was played. Let's just say, the sound quality and volume were pretty impressive and something that could be held on your palm.

Three exceptional looks: The simplicity of look 5 with its fitted polo and cardigan in deeply rich autumnal colours; look 39's somewhat collegiate look but elevated with a delicious blue coat; and the closing look consisting of a metallic yarn polo worn with pleated kilt hybrid.

The takeaway: Too afraid to wear a skirt in public? Start with a Fendi skirt-berms hybrid.

View the full Fendi Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Closing Milan Fashion Week Men's for the Autumn/Winter 2024 season is none other than Zegna. The last show by a major fashion brand in the schedule, artistic director Alessandro Sartori is set to focus the attention on the brand's Oasi Cashmere—the traceable cashmere line that the brand has worked on for about a couple of years now.

What that entails would probably be an Oasi Cashmere-centric collection but in ways that cashmere probably isn't traditionally designed for. Sartori may perhaps take some learnings from his collaboration with The Elder Statesman where colours were bright and punchy while still looking and feeling extremely luxurious.

The Zegna Autumn/Winter 2024 show will be held at Milan's Allianz MiCo, the largest convention centre in Europe. And that only means that the show would most likely be big in scale too. We've seen the line-up of celebrities slated to sit in for the show, and Zegna is certainly closing Milan Fashion Week Men's with a bang. Like the teasers state: "This will be worth the wait."

For any confirmation, stay tuned for the show this Monday. And for an even closer look at the collection, follow @esquiresg on Instagram as we bring you the action live from Milan Fashion Week Men's.

What: Zegna Autumn/Winter 2024 runway show
Where: Milan, Italy
When: Monday, 15 January at 10pm Singapore time

A lot was riding on the Gucci Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection. For one, it's the first menswear collection by creative director Sabato De Sarno; the other reason is that it's a follow-up to a debut that had fashion insiders and fans split. In some cases, the latest effort by De Sarno was similar to his debut, but better—much, much better.

Gucci Ancora took on a slightly different meaning as compared to De Sarno's debut. While the overarching theme of wanting to make people fall in love with Gucci again was apparent, the Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection takes it a step further. Embedded into the line-up—starting from the opening look—were a number of ensembles that mirrored the womenswear debut. They're tweaked slightly, but the spirit was essentially the same. Heck, even the Mark Ronson-curated soundtrack (the man was also in attendance) was an intentional repeat.

The difference—and brilliantly so—was that the menswear collection felt more complete. There's no telling how De Sarno felt post-debut of his very first collection, but if any of the naysayers got to him, this collection felt like he was hell bent on proving them wrong.

The fit: Perhaps, De Sarno is a better menswear designer than he is at womenswear. Because the tailoring (a perennial key tenet of any menswear collection, pretty much) was impeccable. Instead of opting for the easy way out by pandering to current style obsessions, the cut of trousers were slim with enough give for a sleek and clean bottom half. The top was left slightly oversized, but proportionally just right such that the flow and fluidity of floor-grazing coats felt dramatic without weighing one down.

Tailoring may have run rampant throughout the collection, but they were anything but staid or stuffy. Print and patterns seem to not be something that De Sarno may be leaning towards—save for the GG monogram—but colours are clearly his specialty (perhaps something that he picked up during his time at Valentino). Surprisingly, the deep shade of red that's becoming a De Sarno signature for Gucci, was not heavily used throughout the collection. Instead, the additional colours employed ran along the same tonal shades as the new Gucci red. This not only added on to the cohesive nature of the collection, but also elevated it to be rather universal across different ages.

That's not to say that there were no statement pieces; in fact, far from it. In place of ties, a necklace-scarf hybrid was the centre of attention consisting of leather pieces connected by metallic hardware with the former attached to a slender strip of fabric. Each swayed as models walked—a sense of romantic flou that was both refreshing and much needed. And if Harry Styles or Måneskin were to return as part of the Gucci fold, they'd certainly gravitate towards the metallic fringed pieces that exuded the kind of gender-fluid sensibility Gucci had made its own.

The details: As predicted, the Jackie continues to be the focus for the House. Rendered in plenty of iterations—albeit kept a tad simpler and less showy than the female versions—including a thoroughly embellished version, the menswear Jackies were constructed significantly larger.

But what wasn't easily seen on the livestream, were the backs of the looks. De Sarno skilfully ensured that the backs of most, if not all, the looks were crafted as beautifully as the front. Some coats featured a hint of the Gucci webbing right on the vent, while leather coats were embossed with "Gucci" right at centre back along the hem. The drapes and silhouettes too felt devastatingly dramatic from the back—of mystique that you'd want a person wearing a piece to walk by again.

Three exceptional looks: Look 5's ultra clean combination of a long sleeveless coat paired with the collection's trousers as well as studded Horsebit loafers; look 13's all-over GG monogram in red; and look 51's sparkly oversized tank that I would very much like to cop immediately.

The takeaway: Don't strike off De Sarno's Gucci just yet.

View the full Gucci Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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The Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear show season has already begun. After Pitti Uomo in Florence, Milan Fashion Week Men's will officially kick off with Gucci, marking the menswear debut of creative director Sabato De Sarno. And once again, for the second time, the show is being referred to as Gucci Ancora ("again" in Italian).

The Gucci Ancora women's campaign was just released days ago featuring the Spring/Summer 2024 womenswear collection that signalled De Sarno's vision for the House. Included as part of the campaign were a couple of images of male models in denim jeans, holding on to Gucci Jackie bags. While the official press release explicitly avoided referencing the male models, it's safe to assume that Gucci's Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection will be a continuation of the Gucci Ancora aesthetic—pared back with a reiteration of Gucci elegance in the form of cut and silhouette.

The womenswear debut focused heavily on the Jackie as the bag of the season. The menswear debut could follow along the same vein or continue to refocus the attention on the Horsebit creations—an icon that was the House's key push leading up to the release of De Sarno's first collection.

But for any confirmation, stay tuned for the show this Friday. And for an even closer look at the collection, follow @esquiresg on Instagram as we bring you the action live from Milan Fashion Week.

What: Gucci Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear runway show
Where: Milan, Italy
When: Friday, 12 January 2024 at 10pm Singapore time

If I had to pick a clear standout from Milan for the Spring/Summer 2024 womenswear season (with a smattering of menswear in between), it would have to go to Bottega Veneta.

Creative director Matthieu Blazy has managed to create such a niche look for the Italian brand in terms of its ready-to-wear offerings—without the need for overt branding or the use of a singular colour—more than any of his predecessors have done before. The bags and accessories, of course, continue to utilise Bottega Veneta's signature Intrecciato techniques (as they should) but Blazy's emphasis on craft and techniques has offered a distinct point-of-view that has made his ready-to-wear pieces identifiable as Bottega Veneta creations.

"There is a need to reconnect to a primal world of animals, minerals, and plants. It’s like collecting seashells—beautiful, meaningful or meaningless. It’s linked to the beauty of small marvels and natural wonders. It’s embracing something freeform: these are clothes without codes," Blazy says in the collection notes.

For the Bottega Veneta Summer 2024 collection, Blazy once again took us on a journey—one that crossed oceans and continents. Craft was the central connecting thread as culture-specific influences the world over were referenced and mashed together to create pieces that were (mostly) wearable and imbued with extreme technicalities. Yes, this meant that visually, the collection may not have appeared cohesive due to the many different techniques, colours and silhouettes that were employed throughout. The cohesiveness came through conceptually with summer- and beach-inspired ideas of craft apparent in a number of looks.

The fit: There's no singular look to the Bottega Veneta Summer 2024 collection. It was a transition of different moments in time and space—as though Blazy meant to showcase the Bottega Veneta man as one who's worldly and of many different leanings. The show opened with a knit swimwear look that looked as though it was stripped from the '20s (and perhaps one of the few menswear looks that felt wearable for the warmer climes). Although it's difficult to decipher accurately based on images and the runway video alone, I'm fairly certain that Blazy showed a number of his brilliant leather trompe l'œil looks where seemingly everyday pieces were actually crafted from leathers, and paired with leather ties.

What's technically impressive were the knit looks this season. Blazy had shown off a number of knit looks in the past few collections but they seemed to be amped up for Summer 2024 with even more flourishes and done in greater scale. Chunky jumpers and tanks were beautiful, crafted to perfection in complicated patterns but without a homespun quality. These were intended to look high-quality and luxurious—done by hand, yes, but with the precision of skilled, experienced craftsmen.

The details: Things got bigger in the bags department. The Bottega Veneta Summer 2024 bags were supersized such that they'd make pretty decent travelling companions. A massive duffle bag in croc (look 7) was half the size of the model that carried it, while the Sardines in Intrecciato took on their biggest iteration yet with the metallic handle offering an even better grip thanks to the upsized design.

Three exceptional looks: Look 11 and its deliciously chunky knit that enveloped almost the entirety of the ensemble under it; look 53's coordinated look consisting of a shirt and trousers with faggoting and jagged hems; and look 41's updated proposal of a tank-and-trouser fit.

The takeaway: I don't know who's rich enough to purchase Bottega Veneta ready-to-wear, but you'd definitely recognise the look right off the bat.

View the full Bottega Veneta Summer 2024 runway collection in the gallery below.

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Versace is typically not one to quickly hop onto trends or care much about the shifts in consumer tastes. It marches to its own beat—coming up with a new-ish monogram, La Greca, only in 2021 (well after other brands) but relatively sticking to its signature Barocco prints, Medusa logo, and sexually charged designs.

It's surprising then that for Spring/Summer 2024, Donatella Versace decided to do a 180 with a collection that's representative of a return to minimalism—or that often misused phrase, "quiet luxury"—but done the Versace way. To be fair, this wasn't the first instance of Donatella going rogue with a rather minimalist collection. This is, however, perhaps her most successful execution yet.

The fit: The show opened with luxurious duchess silks adorned with the Versace Contrasto Checkerboard—a pattern that debuted in Spring/Summer 1982—in varying sizes and later paired with utilitarian pieces the likes of a perfectly cut trench and multi-pocketed gilet. They were simply teasers of what's to come: a skilful combination of tailoring and Versace motifs rendered in pastel hues.

The checked and square motifs continued on in multiple fabrications including wool crepe tweed. In some instances, checkerboard prints were layered with signature Barocco prints as well as a Versace Rose motif but in quite muted monochromatic renderings such that they weren't fighting for attention.

The focus on cut and tailoring were evident for the Versace Spring/Summer 2024 collection. Lines were sharp and clean with nipped in waists and three-dimensional sculptural shoulder moments that elevated the level of craft and construction further. In look 69 (the most minimal menswear look of the lot) for example, an impeccably tailored jacket with flared trousers showcased the peak of Versace tailoring but at the same time exuded a timeless aesthetic. It's highly edited and pared back, yes; yet the Versace man still exudes a sexy confidence.

The details: There's no denying that there were semblances of Miu Miu and Prada stylings—it's difficult to not reference the of-the-moment combinations, especially when taking on a minimalist approach. But again, Donatella made them her own. The peeking of underwear under trousers, scoop-neck tanks and fine gauge knit cardigans (both interpreted with gorgeous macramé Barocco borders) were reworked codes of Versace sensuality.

There were hints of a feminine-masculine tension that skewed in neither direction yet showed that the Versace man wouldn't be fazed even if it did. He's that confident.

Three exceptional looks: Look 12's maroon leather suit that's a stunning showcase of leather tailoring; the pastel blue mod-tailoring in look 23 with that clever styling of unbuttoning the last few buttons to show a hint of skin and underwear; and look 73's excellent tailoring.

The takeaway: This is how you do timeless, elegant minimalism while evolving house codes without looking like the next Zara collection.

View the full Versace Spring/Summer 2024 runway collection in the gallery below.

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Photo by Zegna

192 bales of raw linen were transported from Normandy to Milan for the Zegna spring/summer 2024 runway show. They formed an oasis of sorts—Zegna calls the show L'Oasi di Lino (translation: the linen oasis)—within the Piazza San Fedele in Milan.

More than a showcase of what's coming up for the season, the show was once again a reiteration of Zegna's efforts at ensuring that its materials—the very basis of the brand—are sourced and produced with as little negative effects to the environment as possible. And before you call out the brand for potentially wasting raw materials for the show's scenography, Zegna ensures that the raw linen will be turned into its Oasi Linen fabric in Italy. It's also committed to certifying Oasi Linen as 100 percent traceable by 2024.

With that, the hero of the Zegna spring/summer 2024 collection is linen. A number of amalgamations were featured throughout the collection with treatments that displayed artistic director Alessandro Sartori's tactile mastery in materiality. And of course, his penchant for monochromatic looks.

The fit: There was an overall sense of ease and lightness to the collection that's typical of Zegna, and it's even more so owed to the generally linen-based fabrication. Shorts were cut roomy and grazed the knees, and were mostly part of coordinates—a Sartori-favoured leitmotif of constant reimaginings of men's suiting. Blazers were cut without lapels for a more streamlined appearance and oversized outerwear were designed with clean lines ensuring that elements were all flushed with little flourishes. On some instances where lapels did appear, they're actually a result of trompe-l'œil techniques, especially visible on the leather pieces (looks 27 and 33).

The collection's knitwear amplified the sense of tactility, adding both visual interest as well as contrasting textures. And if there's one thing that grounded the entire collection, it would be the triangular scarves seen on a number of looks. There's a sprezzatura sensibility about them that conjures this idea of an Italian summer—perhaps lounging around next to bales of hay (or linen) and without a single care in the world.

Photo by Zegna
Photo by Zegna

The details: Soft handbags crafted from supple leather made several appearances, echoing a similar kind of airiness of the ready-to-wear. The footwear though are the stars. The Triple Stitch was adapted into an espadrille-hybrid with visible rope-stitching running along the soles. Sartori also introduced a new slip-on shoe design cut from one piece of leather and affixed with chunky, textured soles for a truly sophisticated look.

Three exceptional looks: Look 14's classic Zegna fit with the addition of a triangular scarf for that added style factor; look 18 was a beautifully cut jumpsuit that retained elements of traditional menswear tailoring, especially in the interior; and look 45's textural masterpiece in the collection's standout flamingo hue.

The takeaway: This is not your grandfather's linen.

View the full Zegna spring/summer 2024 collection in the gallery below.

Look 1. Photo by Zegna
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