For Milan Design Week, Saint Laurent Rive Droite teams with the Gio Ponti Archives, Ginori 1735 and the Fundación Anala y Armando Planchart to showcase a plate collection. But these aren't ordinary plates. These are Villa Planchart Segnaposto Plates and for such an exceptional collection, it is showcased at the Gio Ponti—Villa Planchart exhibition. Saint Laurent's creative director, Anthony Vaccarello, curated the exhibit.  

This collaboration dates back to 1953. That's when Anala and Armando Planchart commissioned renowned Italian architect, Gio Ponti, to construct an avant-garde villa for them on the highest hill overlooking Caracas, Venezuela. While designing the villa, Ponti employed exceptional Italian artisans with traditional expertise for the interior decor of the Villa Planchart. This included the Florentine manufacturer Ginori 1735, for which he had previously worked as artistic director. He designed a set of porcelain tableware decorated with the various symbols of the villa. This pays homage to the village and Anala and Amando. 

Saint Laurent will reissue 12 original plates from the Villa Planchart Segnaposto collection designed by Gio Ponti. These traditionally-crafted decorative porcelain plates are painted by hand in Ginori 1735’s Italian Manifattura. Available in vibrant hues, the plates feature the same motifs that appeared in the porcelain tableware designed for the villa. This included the sun, the crescent moon, the polar star and iterations of the letter “A”—referencing the initials of the villa’s owners.

The limited-edition plates will be available online, at SAINT LAURENT RIVE DROITE Los Angeles, SAINT LAURENT BABYLONE in Paris. Also, for a limited time, by appointment at Saint Laurent’s Milan flagship on Via Montenapoleone during Milan Design Week.

Held at the Chiostri di San Simpliciano, the Gio Ponti—Villa Planchart exhibition will be open from April 16th to 21st. To pre-book tickets, register here.

Loewe isn't just a luxury fashion brand. It's a cultural brand that has—since under the creative directorship of Jonathan Anderson—instilled an even greater importance on craft, including from realms outside of the traditional fashion sphere. Through its many collaborations as well as in-house collections, Loewe continues to give prominence the skill of the hand from within its own studios as well as from cultures around the world.

It may seem like a marketing spiel, this idea of a luxury fashion brand being more than creating products to sell. Yet, the proof is in the way Loewe operates. Its social media platforms delve deeper into how a product is crafted by showing a brief run through of the process, while collection notes often detail the craft behind each collection. Separately, Loewe has its annual Loewe Foundation Craft Prize showcasing and awarding the many different works of craft the world over.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by LOEWE (@loewe)

Crafted World is in itself a collaborative effort. The exhibition was designed in collaboration with famed design studio OMA with each thematic chapter varying in interactivity and scale. "Born from the Hand", for example, tells the story of Loewe's evolution from its leather-making roots to its current contemporary fashion leanings as seen through the showcase of key products such as first-edition signature bags to costumes made in collaboration with Anthea Hamilton. "The Atelier" quite literally transports visitors behind the scenes to discover the many steps needed to craft Loewe's most iconic bags, with the journey ending with a two-metre-tall recreation of the Howl’s Moving Castle bag. Along the way, Crafted World offers plenty of surprises including knee-high exhibits thoughtfully conceptualised for children to interact with.

And once visitors are done exploring the six thematic chapters, a specially curated gift shop filled with exclusive merchandise and books, lets the magic continue at home. But that's not all. Crafted World continues onto the courtyard with a number of Galician artisan Álvaro Leiro's reinterpretations of the traditional, fringed Galician raincoats woven from reeds, straw and briar.

The free-to-public exhibition comes as Anderson hit his 10-year mark as creative director of Loewe last year—a rarity in today's climate of creative directors not lasting more than three years. Plenty of credit should be given to the man for reinvigorating Loewe into one of the most exciting luxury brands out there; as should the artisans whose works are the cornerstone of Loewe. Crafted World does just that.

Crafted World runs until 5 May 2024 at the Shanghai Exhibition Centre before making its way around the world.

Everyone is familiar with Samsonite. The luggage brand that's founded in Denver, Colorado is a juggernaut in the industry, having been around for 113 years now and with a presence in over 130 countries. If you're counting, that's an expansion into more than one country per year since its founding. Impressive.

Samsonite has achieved this by successfully striking a balance between style and functionality. It's one thing to survive any journey, but doing that while being easily recognisable on the baggage claim conveyor belt and looking like a luxurious piece of accessory is no meant feat.

In celebration of the brand's achievements thus far in the luggage space and beyond, Samsonite unveils Destination Samsonite: Voyaging Through Time. The Asia Pacific exhibition lands in Singapore for a limited time and promises to be an immersive experience in discovering the inner workings of the brand as well as its century-long heritage. With innovation constantly on the brand's horizon, Destination Samsonite: Voyaging Through Time also gives glimpses to what's next for Samsonite.

The past

Explore Samsonite's journey in this interactive chart of its key moments.

To understand Samsonite's values and how it has evolved with time, it only makes sense to revisit its heritage. Destination Samsonite: Voyaging Through Time features a number of archive pieces that date back to the 1930s, groundbreaking icons the like of the Streamlite, Silhouette, Oyster and 4-Wheel Spinner as well as present-day pieces such as the C-Lite, Proxis, and Evoa—all meant to serve as representations of Samsonite's evolution from luggage manufacturer to a creator of smart travel solutions. Innovation is key and visitors will discover that Samsonite has got it in spades.

The present

The "Zero Gravity" and "Discover Durability" installations.
Test drive Samsonite's suspension wheels at "Abstract Terrains".

Three thematic installations serve to highlight Samsonite's continued commitment to quality. The use of superior materials not only ensures that each Samsonite piece looks great and functions seamlessly, but also built to last. At "Zero Gravity", the Attrix and C-Lite models will be suspended to showcase their lightweight make—thanks to Roxkin™ and Curv® materials respectively—while "Discover Durability" invites visitors to put Samsonite luggage through a tumble test in order to view first-hand how they withstand force and pressure. Then there's "Abstract Terrains" where Samsonite wheels are tested on their durability and manoeuvrability over different terrains.

The future

Discover Samsonite's three upcoming releases.

Through it all, the future is where Samsonite is constantly looking towards. Destination Samsonite: Voyaging Through Time ends with the introduction of the next stage of Samsonite's evolution through three new releases: the Evoa Z, SBL Major-Lite and New Streamlite. The Evoa Z is an evolution of one of the brand's best-selling models Evoa, with a new minimal and modern design. The SBL Major-Lite is crafted from the lightweight Curv® material and is designed especially for the modern traveller. A limited-edition collection, the New Streamlite is inspired by Samsonite's heritage Streamlite collection, combining modern stylings with timeless design.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Esquire Singapore (@esquiresg)

Destination Samsonite: Voyaging Through Time opens to the public from 1 – 4 November 2023 at 72-13 Gallery, Mohamed Sultan Road, Singapore 239007. Sign up online to visit the exhibition.

Photo: Courtesy of Oval Partnership

This article was created in partnership with the Oval Partnership.

The Kampong Spirit has long been a part of Singapore’s history. Used to describe a positive communal attitude and solidarity of people, there seems to be a common consensus that the Kampong Spirit has been slowly chipping away as Singapore elevates its status from what used to be a small fishing port during the colonial era to its current standing as one of Asia’s most developed countries. The term has long been a part of our past, stemming from the period before Dutch and Portuguese traders landed on our shores. Prior to Western influences, our little red dot was a sleepy fishing village that contributed to Malaysian seafaring and trading.

The story of our island’s humble beginnings with trading may be common knowledge, but less is known about the time before colonial influencers took rein. What was the way of life before the rapid growth of Singapore, and how can our past and present interact meaningfully? That’s precisely what the Oval Partnership and several university research groups from Singapore Management University (SMU) and Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT) sought to answer in the Lost Cities exhibition.

The Lost Cities exhibition is a purposeful stray away from your typical replication of Singapore’s pre-colonial kampong, but a unique display that showcases the pre-colonial urbanism in Asia from a past-meets-present perspective. Guided by exploratory trips to Pulau Ubin and Lorong Buangkok—the two earliest settlements on our island, and now the last two kampongs known to Singapore, the Oval Partnership and researchers took to the local culture and its inhabitants to document and collect first-hand experience of living the kampong life, a cultural gem unbeknownst to most Singaporeans.

Mr Chris Law, Founding Director of The Oval Partnership and visionary behind the exhibition shared, “this event recreates the experience of a bygone age, and enables attendees to explore how life was lived then,” he said. “Now we have a clearer sight of where we came from, and how we were shaped. It deepens our understanding of the giants whose shoulders we stand on, so we can build a better world for the generations that come after us.”

Debuting an experiential exhibition with three key zones, each guided by a reinterpretation of kampong living—The Lost Cities exhibition takes one through a fictional journey of a 14th century kampong through a contemporary lens of the three key themes of heritage, sustainability and community. The highly curated exhibition explores the world of a fictional kampong lead by the visionary female Chief Esah, as their thriving society lives in perfect harmony with nature and progressive cultural practices rooted in equality.

Members of the public can not only expect a refreshing perspective of our island’s past, but also an admirable display of sustainably sourced exhibit materials such as locally sourced wood from ethical wood-makers and non-profit environmental organisations. From interactive displays to creative experiences rooted in cultural kampong practices, exhibit-goers can expect an engaging and unforgettable journey through a reimagined city.

In addition to the research driven exhibits, the Oval Partnership has also tapped into the talents of three multidisciplinary artists—Gilles MassotMarc Nair and Zen Teh, to contribute their take on Singapore’s kampong heritage.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by the Oval partnership (@theovalpartnership)

An immersive experience through time, the Lost Cities exhibition will be taking place from 18 August – 1 October, 2023 in Fort Canning Centre for all members of the public to journey through Singapore’s earliest Kampong cities and dive into the past and present of Kampong heritage.

The Lost Cities Series: Kampong Port Cities of the Pre-colonial Era Exhibition

When: 18th August – 1st October, 2023 (Weekdays: 10am – 6pm, Weekends: 10am – 10pm)

Where: Fort Canning Centre, Singapore

Find out more

Originally published on Grazia SG

crosschevron-down