The collab between adidas and Australian fashion house Song for the Mute combines functions and looks. It may be trite but it must be doing something because this is their third team-up. For this new Song for the Mute x adidas 003 collection, Creative Director Lyna Ty reinterprets heritage silhouettes with modernist fabrication and detailing. This partnership oversees the reimagining of the iconic Country OG silhouette. This, as well as, a new apparel range that includes sportswear essentials. 

At the heart of this collection lies the reinterpreted Country OG silhouette. Now dubbed simply as the “SFTM-003”, it is available in three 90’s inspired colourways. You've grey and teal, those hues are reminiscent of vintage windbreakers, and finally, in black. Each pair arrives with an additional metallic D-ring hardware combined with a custom paracord-inspired toggle lacing system. A perfect synergy and a nod to "futuristic nostalgia". Keeping to its roots, the kicks retain its beloved soft cushioning, grippy outsole and low-profile build. Finally, to cap it off, the flexible leather upper blends everyday comfort with an elevated look.

The Apparel

Sherpa fleece zip-up jackets with digital printed contrast sleeves
Distressed jersey hoodie, press-stud track pants in a lightweight coated cotton
Custom jacquard knitwear with intricate contrasting colour-work
Custom jacquard knitwear with intricate contrasting colour-work

As for the collaborative apparel essentials, Ty dabbles in new textile directions and techniques in the apparel range. You've your sherpa fleece zip-up jackets that's accompanied by digital printed contrast sleeves. There are distressed jersey hoodies, an oversized blazer and press-stud track pants in a lightweight coated cotton. Rounding up the range is a custom jacquard knitwear that comes with an intricate contrasting colour-work.

Song for the Mute x adidas 003 is readily available at adidas Brand Centre Orchard, adidas VivoCity Originals B1 as well as online and the adidas CONFIRMED App.

With the release of Dune: Part Two right around the corner, the cast has been on a press tour the world over. There's no denying that they're taking the fashion seriously too. From red carpet premieres to photocalls, Timothée Chalamet and Austin Butler—portraying Paul Atreides and newly introduced Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen, respectively—have been showcasing a diverse array of looks. Each outfit chosen had been statements in their own right, and are deserving of as much hype as the movie itself.

CinemaCon 2023

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At CinemaCon 2023, Chalamet was decked out in a grungy look as he wore an edgy leather vest by Helmut Lang over a white T-shirt and skinny leather motorcycle trousers with built-in knee pads. To finish off the biker aesthetic, a pair of pointed black leather boots was the footwear of choice.

Jimmy Kimmel Live!

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At the casts’ appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Chalamet's edgy outfit consisted of a sleeveless black sweatshirt with grommet detailing by Junya Watanabe x Stüssy, leather trousers from Alexander McQueen and black boots. However, he switched things up with a cozy knit from Hermès during the taping.

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Butler arrived in a black unbuttoned shirt, wearing a matching black pinstriped suit over, and boots. He also had on a thin silver chain necklace, proving that it's what one needs to complete any suit look.

Mexico City photocall

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Chalamet wore a sleeveless calf hair top from Hermès' yet-to-be-released Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection, matched with trousers and chunky leather boots. Butler, on the other hand, opted for something a little more relaxed with a simple white T-shirt under a grey unbuttoned three-piece by Givenchy.

Mexico City premiere

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The duo kept it smart in Mexico City. Chalamet wore a custom Prada suit and a black poplin v-neck shirt with what is decidedly his more experimental look thus far. The blazer was tucked in and accessorised with a double tour Prada belt.

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Butler rocked a striking pinstripe suit from Saint Laurent’s Spring/Summer 2024 ready-to-wear collection with cutting shoulders. Completing the look, he opted for a gold-buckled belt—not too excessive but also not too modest.

Paris photocall

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In Paris, the Dune lead stayed rather safe with a black turtleneck and sleek leather pants (notably a recurring trend with the actor) from Bottega Veneta's Spring/Summer 2023 collection. Cartier jewellery and a pair of Oliver Peoples sunglasses completed the easy look.

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Butler exuded effortless style in a monochromatic Fear of God ensemble, featuring loose-fit clothing with relaxed shoulders—a departure from his usual tailored suits. He completed the look with understated David Yurman jewellery.

Paris premiere

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Chalamet wore a custom shiny metal breastplate from Givenchy with a graphic turtleneck. He had also worn a black wool jacket featuring a notch lapel with matching wool trousers. Cartier accessories such as a platinum Cintrée timepieces from the Rééditions collection and a sizeable silver ring.

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Butler dressed smart in yet another Louis Vuitton ensemble, which consisted of a sharply tailored black jacket over a crisp white dress shirt, and a striking pair of flared pants reminiscent of the '70s. He kept it easy with a pair of black dress shoes, and a ring for a little hint of jewellery.

London photocall

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Chalamet's fish scale wool sweater was from Bottega Veneta’s women’s collection, reiterating that clothing has no gender. And if his legs looked longer than usual, that's all thanks to the chocolate brown leather pants matched with a set of Ripley Boots by Bottega Veneta as well.

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Butler was wearing a custom three-piece double-breasted suit by Louis Vuitton in an offbeat shade of grey. The unusually wide-lapel blazer and waistcoat, once again, blends a sense of timelessness with a contemporary twist that Butler tends to favour.

London premiere

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Chalamet reunited with designer Haider Ackermann, donning on metallic trousers that were difficult to not miss, and paired with an oversized black shirt. For accessories, he wore a custom Cartier necklace featuring invert-set diamonds in orange, yellow, brown, and white hues, designed to mimic the desert landscape in Dune.

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Butler's penchant for tailoring saw him taking on a black Sabato de Sarno for Gucci overcoat paired with a white vest. It's perhaps simple in execution but sleek and dramatic all the same.

Seoul photocall and press conference

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Chalamet was seen sporting powdery blue overalls from South Korean designer Juun.J's Spring/Summer 2024 collection, in a deliberate move to twin with fellow lead Zendaya. He finished off the look with simple silver necklaces and a pair of Chelsea boots in the same exact shade, sticking true to the runway look.

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Butler was also dressed in blue, opting for a Valentino suit with a silk shirt of a lighter shade. But instead of keeping to the monochromatic tones of the clothes, the footwear of choice was a black pair of dress shoes. A silver necklace completed the entire look.

Seoul premiere

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For Seoul's premiere, Chalamet chose a sleek white suit paired with black leather boots, both courtesy of Gucci. Continuing his partnership with Cartier, he wore a single Cartier diamond necklace for a touch of elegance—just one of his many moments with the luxury brand throughout the press tour.

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Butler kept it classic with a black pinstriped double-breasted suit layered over a white dress shirt, matching the entire ensemble with a black tie and black dress shoes.

Dune: Part Two will show in cinemas on 29 February 2024.

Many things come and go (and come again) in fashion. Yet, the elegance of formal menswear continues to stand the test of time. One may argue that there’s less of a need to be decked out in a full suit these days. But that doesn’t mean that the category has been rendered completely obsolete.

Louis Vuitton’s latest "New Formal" menswear collection reiterates the fusion of timeless elegance with modern tailoring. elevating formal staples with luxury craftsmanship. Following the Spring/Summer 2024 debut, this latest trans-seasonal instalment places a spotlight on slim suiting. Single-breasted jackets are paired with cigarette trousers for a timeless silhouette. It exudes an air of confidence and refined professonalism. Apart from being available in classic shades of black and navy, an option in white makes for the perfect fit for an evening soirée.

The Damier motif that’s been further emphasised by Louis Vuitton men’s creative director Pharrell Williams adorns everything from suiting to footwear. With a wavy motif and pinstripes cut on the bias, it add a subtle, dynamic flair. As if one needs more examples on how this isn’t your father’s idea of tailoring. Footwear styles such as the Sorbonne loafers, Varenne Chelsea boots and Richelieus in rich leather tones complement the tailored options. They prove to be key staples of the “New Formal” collection.

Formality here, however, isn’t just defined by suiting. This new instalment expands the idea of formalwear with tailored outerwear that act as complementary, timeless options. An elegant navy suede leather blouson, a beige peacoat designed with a shearling collar, as well as a parka constructed as a three-in-one piece, all offer the kind of versatility one would expect from a collection meant to be an indispensable investment. Wear them with the extensive coordinated options of the “New Formal” tailoring. Or pair them with other more casual wardrobe staples for an elegant quick-fix.

Iconic bag styles like the Keepall travel bag and the Aerogram Lock It tote suit every professional need. The Georges tote—introduced in the first instalment—makes a return as it becomes an emblem for the collection. Crafted in Millésime grained leather by Domaine des Massifs, the design is sleek, stylish, and hardy such that it makes for a brilliant alternative to an ordinary briefcase.

The suit is dead, long live the suit.

The latest Louis Vuitton "New Formal" collection is now available in Louis Vuitton boutiques and online.

Edited by Asri Jasman

Nostalagia hit the runway at the Burberry Winter 2024 show. Not only was the show's soundtrack a selection of Amy Winehouse's songs—"You Know I'm No Good", "In My Bed", "Half Time", and "Back to Black"—the show was opened by Agnyess Deyn. And if you were in your teens in the 2000s like me, Deyn would be a familiar name and figure—an English model known for her platinum blonde pixie cut and a fashion inspiration for girls and boys of the time.

The fashion served a similar platter of nostalgia. Chief creative officer Daniel Lee refocused his attention towards the military heritage of Burberry for the Winter 2024 collection with a colour palette that captured the earthy tones of the outdoors. Now that the new brand signifiers have been put in place—the Equestrian Knight Design, the Burberry knight blue and key bags emblematic of Lee's creative direction—its the coats that were reworked with a further military slant.

The fit: Trench coats took on new forms both in silhouette as well as the way they were worn. Instead of belting to accentuate the waist, the belt was tied from the back for a more minimal front. The collar was turned up and buttoned up to create a funnel neck (practical for the colder seasons). The trench coats were also dressed with the oversized epaulettes that were first introduced in Lee's debut collection for Burberry, as well as new keyring hardware that zipped up the front of the coat to the storm flap. The latter an example of Lee's penchant for decorative hardware at Burberry.

There was a decidedly oversized silhouette employed throughout the collection, exuding a sense of warmth and protection that Lee intended. But also, an extension of a signature British aesthetic prevalent on the streets.

Duffle coats and field jackets took on more voluminous forms as they were either crafted from fleecy wool or trimmed with a burst of braided fringing. Zippers on these outerwear were extended to trousers too, with each side consisting of three zipper pulls to allow for creative manipulation. They're reminiscent of those trackpants lined with buttons along the sides that were a big part of the noughties, but here, the attention was front and centre.

The details: On the bags front, a variation of the Trench Tote bag seemed to be a key push. Constructed with zippered sides, they were available in a number of materials with the standout being the ones featuring the Burberry check. And if I'm being honest, a more superior version that the original. The Shield bag, on the other hand, received a more functional upgrade with an exterior compartment.

While the knight blue wasn't part of the colour palette, it wasn't completely stripped from the Burberry Winter 2024 collection—its Lee's coloured signifier for the brand, after all. With every step of each model, the colour peeked through from the soles of every footwear. Not that we need to be reminded of how much that colour is now a part of Burberry (there's a whole knight blue takeover of Harrods that's still going on), but perhaps it's one of those subliminal messaging cleverly employed.

Three exceptional looks: Look 7 had the makings of being the next go-to fit for every British renegade youth; the easy and comfort-first look 19 with that plush mustard vest; and look 48's moleskin trench that's cool in every way.

The takeaway: I'm inclined to say that this is the best Lee for Burberry collection yet.

View the full Burberry Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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The idea of form versus function is often a conundrum that's faced by designers. Should the former supersede the latter or vice versa? Or is there a middle-ground where both tenets of design balance out each other such that there isn't much of a compromise to either? The considerations are heightened further when it comes to meeting the needs of travellers who now care more than just getting from one point to another.

For TUMI, that steely balance of form and function is best exemplified in its innovative 19 Degree Aluminium series. Launched by creative director Victor Sanz in 2016, the 19 Degree Aluminium series was a breakthrough for the performance luxury lifestyle and accessories brand as it manipulated aluminium in its own vision for the first time. Each piece is crafted with the now-signature sinewy lines enveloping the entirety of its contours—both as a bold, visual manifestation of the toughness of the material as well as an engineered element for added rigidity. It helps too that the look is as striking as it is durable.

As we said, good looks would only get a design so far, especially in the travel space. TUMI clearly knows this too. The 19 Degree Aluminium series is packed with nifty technical specs that make travelling with one—on pretty much any kind of journey—as beautiful as the intended destination. Rollers are fitted with dual-recessed, ball bearing wheels to ensure smooth, effortless glides, while the telescoping handle fits comfortably when gripped. These innovations (and more) add to the beauty of having a 19 Degree Aluminium piece as a companion—they're beautiful, and essentially so.

The 19 Degree Aluminium Backpack is another first for TUMI.

In the latest chapter of TUMI's "Essentially Beautiful" campaign, global ambassador and pro-footballer Son Heung-Min makes a return to introduce an expansion to the 19 Degree Aluminium family. Highlighting both the aesthetics as well as the inner-workings of the series that make it essentially beautiful, the campaign is arguably TUMI's boldest yet as Son traverses an abstract world inspired by the elements of the series. His main companion of choice? A 19 Degree Aluminium Backpack that once again, sees TUMI challenging the idea of form and function.

The backpack design is a first of its kind for TUMI, allowing the already iconic luggage design to be carried in a new way. But instead of simply slapping on leather straps to the existing design, the brand reconfigured the entire construction. The leather straps of the Backpack are connected to a leather back panel—marked with the same 19 Degree contours—that's fitted with a top handle and a sleeve meant to easily slip over extended luggage handles. The Backpack itself opens up from the top with a frame opening, while a front pocket reveals itself with the push of the leather monogram patch.

19 Degree Aluminium Luggage.
19 Degree Aluminium Carry-On and Luggage.
19 Degree Aluminium Backpack.

But that's far from what TUMI has to offer. The new line-up includes a Compact Carry-On that's essentially a scaled down version of the 19 Degree Aluminium, designed for travellers who prefer something smaller. It also comes with a removable file divider, making it quite an upgrade for those looking to transport documents. If not, there's the new Briefcase that's categorically sleek at every angle yet still sturdy and durable.

Form versus function? That's certainly hardly the case here.

The new TUMI 19 Degree Aluminium series is now available at the TUMI ION Orchard, Mandarin Gallery, and Marina Bay Sands stores. And check out the other signature TUMI lifestyle bag styles too while you're at it.

The Alpha Bravo Navigation Backpack.
The Harrison Gregory Sling.

If music was Bob Marley’s first love then football was a close second. It'd be one that he would interweave with his day job as frequently as possible.

While touring, he’d make the most of his breaks with an impromptu match against his Wailers bandmates. Even if the only available pitch was a petrol station during a tour-bus pit stop. His manager, Allan ‘Skill’ Cole, was credited as Jamaica’s greatest footballer well before taking up Marley’s job offer. The latter was even known to say that he wished he could sing as well as Cole could play football.

After Marley moved to London following an assassination attempt in Kingston, Jamaica, his love of the beautiful game got noticed for a different reason. It wasn’t only his dribbling skills that caught attention, but his drip, too.

The Look

Marley's most iconic sighting came when he was papped kicking a ball about in Battersea Park, sporting a navy tracksuit tucked into socks, over a striped knit, a pair of adidas Copa Mundials on his feet. Perhaps not as eye-catching as the Rastafarian jackets or double denim ensembles he’d wear on stage. But a look that was more easily replicable in the wardrobes of footy lads around the world.

Marley wasn’t one to reserve these looks for the pitch, either—as the new biopic, Bob Marley: One Love, depicts. From the recording studio to downtime with family, the famous adidas set (often worn as separates) features within the film, reflecting a long-standing relationship, and love, of the German brand. In an interview in 2017, the curator of adidas Spezial, Gary Aspden, credited the musician as the first person “to adopt head-to-toe sportswear as a look off the field, way before hip-hop and rappers took [it] on”.

To honour what would have been the musician’s 78th birthday this year, adidas dropped a 70s-inspired Jamaica Originals football collection. It comes with tracksuits, T-shirts and a football kit doused in the colours of the Jamaican flag. It has also collaborated with the Jamaican Football Federation to create the kit for the country’s national teams, the Reggae Girlz and the Reggae Boyz. All these under the design direction of British-Jamaican designer Wales Bonner.

Marley has often been referenced in the wider fashion world, too.

Other Homages

On the catwalk, Prada (for SS05) and Tommy Hilfiger (for SS16) both paid homage, where the latter included his own take on the look. In 2018, Noah collaborated with Marley’s record label Tuff Gong, peppering pieces with the man’s charming aesthetic and that of the Jamaican music scene. Wales Bonner also used Marley as the inspiration behind her first collaboration with adidas. Since its launch in November 2020, the fruits of that partnership have become more covetable with every passing season.

A still from Bob Marley: One Love, where Bob Marley (Kingsley Ben-Adir) wears an adidas track jacket
CHIABELLA JAMES

Part of Marley's authenticity came from his devotion to his native home. It’s the same spirit that’s found in a group of up-and-coming designers with Jamaican roots. Bianca Saunders and Martine Rose are two London-based creatives who’ve risen the ranks in the menswear scene. They honour their heritage with a forward thinking approach. Even smaller brands, like Diotima and Theophilia, have been nominated for (and won, in the case of the former) awards from LVMH and the CFDA respectively.

But back to the tracksuit. Because if there was one ensemble you could take from Marley, it should be this. Why? Because the two-piece effortlessly works for all casual occasions—doesn’t hurt that you’ll be comfy while wearing it, too.

Originally published on Esquire UK

BBC Studios

On BBC's Doctor Who, there is a long, long (I'm talking, like, since the 1960s kind of long) tradition of each new generation of the Doctor having his or her own distinctive look. For David Tennant's Doctor, it was a slim-fitting pinstripe suit, a tie, and Converse high-tops. For Matt Smith's Doctor, it was a funky red bow tie, suspenders, and, often, a tweed blazer. And for the newest Doctor (Ncuti Gatwa), it boils down to something simultaneously fresh and vintage: Grenson's Sneaker 51.

BBC Studios

Gatwa debuted as the Fifteenth Doctor in last year's Christmas special. As is par for the course for Doctor Who, he kicked some alien ass, saved a few lives with his new companion, and introduced the world to his iteration of the iconic character. And he did all of it in a British heritage brand that combines history with modernity. At the end of the day, isn't that the heart and soul of Doctor Who?

Really, there couldn't be a more fitting shoe of choice for the Doctor than Sneaker 51. Grenson, as a footwear company, can trace its English roots all the way back to 1866. The brand made a name for itself by crafting high-quality, traditional footwear for over 150 years. Just the blink of an eye, if you're the Doctor. He's evolving with the times to produce modernised footwear and accessories. Now, the brand has a factory in Rushden, Northamptonshire. It's not quite Gallifrey. But it's clearly a place where the Doctor can source some "G"-logo kicks that are good enough for escaping a goblin spaceship.

BBC Studios

The Sneaker 51 (which the Doctor pairs with a very retro outfit) takes its inspiration from sneakers of the '70s. It has calf leather and suede panels that imbue the style with a fresh feel. The shoes, like Doctor Who, are British heritage pieces brought back to life for the 21st century, paying homage to their roots. Gatwa's new season of Doctor Who doesn't air until later, but if the showrunners are already building Fifteen's identity down to the very detail of his shoes, this is going to be another era of the show that's absolutely unmissable.

Originally published on Esquire US

Recognised for its expertise and the quality of its products, Rolex stays true to the notion of perpetual excellence instilled by its founder, Hans Wilsdorf. This led to a slew of watchmaking innovations. Such as the Perpetual 1908, a masterpiece that’s inspired by the iconic Oyster Perpetual from 1931.

With its legacy ever in the rear-view mirror, the 1908 is a testimony of historic codes with ground-breaking watchmaking innovations. “1908” is the given name of the model. It's an homage to the year Wilsdorf devised the name “Rolex” to sign his creations and registered the brand in Switzerland. It is also a promise of unparalleled performance. Imagine the Oyster Perpetual timepiece but in a slimmer, sleeker design that’s replete with the brand’s signature style.

Crafted in 18k yellow or white gold, the slim case aggrandises a transparent back; a window into its beating heart—the movement finishings within. The innovative calibre 7140 is what powers the watch. A brand-new self-winding movement that is meticulously developed and manufactured by the Swiss Manufacture’s engineers. With two centre hands and a small seconds display, the calibre 7140 is a pinnacle of innovation, backed by five patent applications.

The Perpetual 1908 caseback reveals the calibre 7140 movement.

Caged within the sleek watch case is the essence of Rolex’s engineering prowess: the innovation of the oscillator, the Chronergy escapement, the Syloxi hairspring and Paraflex shock absorbers, just to name a few. The 1908 offers a substantial power reserve. Approximately 66 hours of chronometric performance (–2/+2 seconds per day) to keep it ticking without worry of pause.

Distinct Arabic numerals 3, 9 and 12, along with a small seconds subdial at six o’clock beautifully reinterprets the 1931 Oyster Perpetual style. It paints the timepiece in a contemporary allure.

The 1908 is fitted on an alligator strap that comes in either matte brown or matte black. This elegant strap with a green calfskin lining and tone-on-tone stitching, is individually tailored for the new watch. It is equipped with a Dualclasp, a double folding clasp, in 18 ct yellow or white gold. Thanks to its carefully designed shape, the Dualclasp always sits centred on the wrist.

The double folding dualclasp.

The 1908 is a timepiece, yes. But it is also a milestone, a testament of a brand’s storied mastery and its perpetual quest for excellence. 

Antony Lindsay, CEO of Fabergé

On a warm afternoon in the middle of nowhere, Antony Lindsay, the newly-appointed CEO of Fabergé sits before us as the ice in a glass next to an unopened can of Coke, tinkles as it melts. As the CEO of a storied brand like Fabergé, Lindsay’s task is to spread the word (and work) of the Romanov’s favourite jewellery house. With Sincere Watch Limited as its official retailer in Singapore, Fabergé continues to make its presence known. And yes, Fabergé is synonymous with the gem-encrusted eggs but the house has other achievements like jewelled boxes; animals carved out of precious stones and other ornamental objects.

In 2007, the brand underwent a revival. Taking inspiration from its storied past, Fabergé created original pieces like the Vissionnaire watches, where a Chronograph model displays two time zones at once, and the Altruist line, which has a clean and simple-to-read dial, with a crown that’s reminiscent of winding up a traditional clock. The collection that secured Fabergé’s footing in the hard jewellery world is the Compliquée models, which won the 2015 Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève award.

As water pool at the bottom of the glass, Lindsay talks to us. About his history, where Fabergé is at and the future.

ESQUIRE: Did Sean Gilbertson (Fabergé’s last CEO) leave you with any wisdom when you took over?

ANTONY LINDSAY: [laughs] There’s been many over the years. I’ve known Sean, coming up to almost 14 years, and we shared some moments, both good and challenging. Nothing springs to mind... except for this Winston Churchill quote, “If you ever find yourself going through hell, keep walking.”

ESQ: What’s your journey been like?

AL: I come from a family of jewellers and had an interest in gemmology at a young age. I’ve been neurolinguistically programmed to appreciate jewellery, timepieces and objets d’art just by hanging out at my dad’s atelier on the weekends. I’d look at the gemstones handled by the craftspeople. I have an appreciation for hard luxury and completed my apprenticeship as a bench jeweller. I’m proud of having played such an important role within Fabergé for about 14 years. I’ve worn different hats as well. Proud when I was appointed MD and was invited to join the board of Gemfields UK Limited. As well as becoming CEO this year.

I feel privileged and fortunate to be part of a team to write the next chapter of one of the most celebrated names in luxury. I see that as an honour. It’s the revival of the coloured gemstones on one hand and it’s also the revival of Fabergé on the other. It’s what keeps us very busy.

ESQ: What sets Fabergé apart from the rest of your competition?

AL: I’d say that Fabergé’s reputation for unrivalled craftsmanship and design is globally recognised. I’d say Fabergé’s diverse use of techniques like the guilloché enamel with the use of hard stone or visible setting. In keeping with tradition, we seek to work with the finest ateliers. Because we don’t have our own workshop, we seek out workmasters all around the world. That’s quite unique to us.

ESQ: Speaking of tradition, how do you maintain that heritage while courting the newer generation?

AL: That’s a good question. It’s important to us that we pay homage and recognise what was done in the past. We draw inspiration from Peter Carl Fabergé, whether that be through his philosophies, values or craftsmanship. To apply it in a modern and contemporary and relevant way; we like to consider ourselves as a forward-thinking brand.

ESQ: How did your partnership with Sincere come about?

AL: I’d say that we are actively looking to partner with the finest retailers in existence. We don’t profess to understand every market on the planet. So, we believe that by partnering with the best of the best, who understands how to represent a brand like Fabergé; and how to offer first-class customer service... that’s very important to us. Sincere Watch Group is the perfect fit for Fabergé and we’re delighted that they are representing us here in Singapore and soon in other parts of South East Asia.

Compliquée Peacock Emerald Watch

ESQ: What would you introduce to someone new to Fabergé?

AL: I would introduce the Compliquée Peacock watch, which is quintessentially Fabergé. We took inspiration from the Imperial Peacock Egg and, in keeping with the Fabergé tradition, we sought out the finest watch movement manufacturer and that led us to Jean-Marc Wiederrecht of Agenhor and now his two sons, Nicolas and Laurent, who run the business on a day-to-day basis. Throughout the discussions with them, we made the Peacock watch that has a special retrograde movement, that functions off four gears, and that allows us to add a feature for the peacock’s tail to unfurl.

ESQ: Peacocks, playing cards; are there other motifs that will utilise that movement in the future?

AL: There are some plans and they are confidential. [laughs]

ESQ: You talked about Fabergé as a book that you’re proud to be part of. What is the next chapter?

AL: To continue this revival and personally—and I know I speak on behalf of my co-workers—it’s about ensuring that the Fabergé story can still be told. What Fabergé symbolises is more than simply luxury and decadence. For us, it’s about creating prized possessions that can stand the test of time and be passed down through the generations. That’s important to us and runs through our DNA. You can scour through Christie’s and see that Fabergé is one of the highly sought-after hard luxury names in existence. 

At the recently concluded Louis Vuitton Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear runway show during Paris Fashion Week Men's, BamBam was one of many celebrity attendees. The Thai-born singer and rapper of K-pop group GOT7 easily stood out with his red hair and Pharrell Williams-designed fit. Wearing look 9 from the Maison's Spring/Summer 2024 menswear collection, BamBam (like the style savant that he is) put his own spin by opting for black trousers instead of shorts, heavy-duty boots, and finished it off with pearl accessories.

His presence at the show was quite a social media hit. The hashtag #BamBamXLVFW24—an unofficial, fanbase-initiated hashtag—amassed over 2.1 million posts on various platforms. It's little wonder that weeks after the show, BamBam was officially announced as Louis Vuitton's newest house ambassador. "I am super happy to join Louis Vuitton as a house ambassador this time," BamBam says in an announcement video. "What Pharrell is doing here is amazing. I'm super honoured to be part of it."

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The appointment is made sweeter as not only is BamBam now part of Louis Vuitton's illustrious list of ambassadors, he also joins fellow bandmate, Jackson Wang, who has been part of the fold since 2023. Wang was even one of the faces of the Maison's "Horizons Never End" campaign that centred on its spirit of travel. It may be too soon to say for sure if BamBam will be featured in an upcoming campaign, but given his pull and reach, we'd say the chances of one is quite likely. In an official press release, Louis Vuitton has already hinted on "an exciting collaborative journey".

This road to an house ambassadorship with Louis Vuitton, however, was a longtime coming. BamBam had already been wearing Louis Vuitton on a number of occasions years before. And while it's common for those in the K-pop sphere to wear the newest threads from the big fashion houses, Louis Vuitton seemed to be quite a prominent fixture in BamBam's roster of brands.

BamBam in a Louis Vuitton suit for his first mini-album in 2021.
A Nicholas Ghesquière-designed Louis Vuitton womenswear look.
From a Louis Vuitton ring...
...to a Louis Vuitton bag.
Repping the new Pharell Williams-era Speedy.

In 2021, he wore a Louis Vuitton suit featuring a watercolour version of its famed Monogram for the music video of "riBBon" that's part of his first mini-album. The musician even wore a Nicholas Ghesquière-designed Spring/Summer 2022 womenswear look the very same year, proving that the man can rock just about anything from the Maison's universe. Throughout the year and years since, BamBam frequently repped Louis Vuitton—from jewellery to bags to ready-to-wear—in a number of magazine editorials, appearances as well as performances.

He made his first Louis Vuitton runway appearance at Williams' debut show, where he was visibly overjoyed to be reunited with Wang. And simply put, that moment became the turning point in his relationship with the Maison. Not only was he deserving of a spot on the front row of one of fashion's biggest moment that season, it was an official recognition of BamBam as a worthy ambassador of the Maison's new chapter.

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And to have it happen after celebrating 10 years of with GOT7, we reckon BamBam as a style icon is about to get more traction.

Edited by Asri Jasman

Givenchy

The fit: The Givenchy Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear show was an intimate one. Held salon-style at its Parisian headquarters, the collection was designed by the Givenchy studio—Matthew M. Williams' final collection was for Pre-Autumn 2024. To be honest, even without the hand of a known creative director, the Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection felt a lot more refined with just enough injections of playful modern nuances.

The entire collection was based on founder Hubert de Givenchy's personal wardrobe with elements that he had a penchant for. The use of the colour sapphire, for example, was adopted because de Givenchy adored it as a replacement for black, while cut up armholes of outerwear were an ode to his penchant for capes. Tailoring was central to the collection—although trousers could have done with a little bit of length adjustments but I'm just nitpicking—with suits and tailored outerwear making up a bulk of the collection. And in true Givenchy style, the shoulders were strong and cutting.

The details: Fun came with the way that an archival cat motif was incorporated into some of the looks. It was done tongue-in-cheek as a oversized parka that featured a number of the cat faces seemingly drowning in their own fur, and in another, the fur took on the form of a shearling jacket-cape hybrid. In look 18, it became a mini shearling crossbody that was paired with a tank featuring the print.

What was quite a stunner, especially up close, was the closing look's jacket. Beautifully ornate, the jacket was a reminder of the kind of craftsmanship that the design studio is capable of, and one that had been sorely missed on the runways.

Three exceptional looks: Look 2's interpretation of the studio's blouse blanche as a workwear staple; the double cardigan styling of look 13; and the closing look.

The takeaway: Not all luxury fashion houses need to infuse some semblance of streetwear into their designs.

View the full Givenchy Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Sean Suen

The fit: Within the realm of menswear tailoring, the structures and limits are palpable, owing to the time-honoured techniques of not only constructing a suit, but also in the idea of tailoring as a garment of authority. Chinese designer Sean Suen recognises this. His eponymous label's Autumn/Winter 2024 collection—and also, pretty much his entire repertoire thus far—tapped on the conventions of tailoring by referencing the period where Western tailoring began being adopted by the East.

There's an undeniably rebellious take on tailoring, and I'm not even talking about the one look where the model revealed some derrière. Traditional menswear silhouettes were deconstructed before being spliced together, creating asymmetrical shapes that formed beautiful drapes. At the heart of it was a '50s-led reference with wide ties and geometric prints indicative of the period.

The details: While the tailoring was, in every sense, contemporary, Suen included mandarin-collared suiting. But of course, they were also rendered in more contemporary styles—the first outing saw elongated sleeves with an oversized bodice with equally oversized patch pockets.

On a number of looks, Suen piled on the waistbands. On a number of occasions, they took on the appearance of a visible ribbed knit layer (akin to that play of visible boxer waistbands) while others were more literal interpretations of a double layer of trouser waistbands.

Three exceptional looks: Look 2 and its spliced collar and draped asymmetry; the obvious old-school reference of look 11 but made fresh; and the regality of look 27 that had tie bars used as lapel pins.

The takeaway: There are always ways to move around the preconceived confines of menswear, and Sean Suen is becoming quite a master at it.

View the full Sean Suen Autumn/Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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Dries Van Noten

The fit: Dries Van Noten can do no wrong in my eyes. There's consistency in his design aesthetic—you can definitely tell a Dries Van Noten piece even with the brand steering away from obvious logos and branding—but Papa Dries offers something new every season.

For Autumn/Winter 2024, the man known for his play with prints and proportions, kicked things off with a string of dark tailored looks. Each felt different and at times disjointed from the one before—yet that was the unifying narrative. The collection was a play in the unexpected and of juxtaposition. There was no telling what the next look would be as he moved from a cuttingly tailored suit worn almost rock-and-roll-like with a fringed, long scarf, to a deconstructed jumper worn over a languid, long coat.

As the darks became increasingly punctuated by textures and infusions of muted colours, Papa Dries revealed a sudden spate of his signature prints and colour-blocking. But at the same time, they remained washed and pared back in intensity.

The details: There was a studied use of garments in non-traditional ways. Jumpers were worn either unzipped from the side or completely cropped with zippered hems. Leather was used as mock-neck tops, while shirting and a number of jackets were fastened with brooches and pins for a rakish drape that was simply sublime. Long opera-like gloves took on many different forms and added edge to some of the simplest tailoring and combinations in the collection.

But at the end of it all, everything was wearable—a key Dries Van Noten element.

Three exceptional looks: Look 9 that I honestly wanted to wear right there and then off the runway; look 24's brilliant use of textures and draping; and look 53 that's a combination of both.

The takeaway: Whatever Papa Dries has been doing to keep his creativity constantly fresh yet consistent, I want it.

View the full Dries Van Noten Autumn/Winter 2024 menswear collection in the gallery below.

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Kenzo

The fit: Kenzo was my last show for day four of Paris Fashion Week Men's and after a rather exhausting day, it personally wasn't as exciting as it ought to be in the moment. The venue was spectacular, however. Held at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, the space offered a brilliant backdrop for an Autumn/Winter 2024 collection themed around the cross-cultural exchange of the origins of the fictional universe of the Star Wars franchise.

Thankfully, artistic director Nigo opted to not be literal with the inspiration—there weren't obvious nods to the films nor were there prints done in collaboration with the franchise. But rather, he chose to incorporate the Asian influences of the Star Wars lore and references into the silhouettes. Outerwear had semblances of sci-fi with knot fastenings adorning the front.

The details: The silhouettes may not have been severe or fashion-forward, but the prints added some punch to the entire collection. A woven pattern inspired by Japanese hikeshi-banten fireman's jackets appeared on everything from suits to workwear, while a number of different tiger motifs were rendered in jacquards and embroideries.

Three exceptional looks: Look 6's more extravagant coords that featured the collection's more standout motif; look 30's streamlined tailoring; and look 50 that felt more Kenzo by Nigo.

The takeaway: Elevated and streamlined, yes. But where's the fun?

View the full Kenzo Autumn/Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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The 66th Annual Grammy Awards continued to be quite a show. Taylor Swift may have made history as the first person to win "Album of the Year" four times, but there were more noteworthy moments that happened onstage. Swift's award was presented by Celine Dion, who made her first public appearance since taking a break from performing after being diagnosed with stiff person syndrome. The legendary Joni Mitchell—with a career spanning 60 years—performed for the first time on the award show, while Tracy Chapman made her return to the Grammy stage after a nine-year break from performing live.

Aside from the showcase and honouring of musical brilliance, the Grammys also served as a dazzling runway for fashion statements. From John Legend to 21 Savage, the evening’s attendees and nominees offered quite a visual feast. After a year filled with memorable musical journeys, the fashion too had to follow suit. And there wasn't any lack of it on the red carpet—proving once again that at the Grammys, excellence extends beyond beats and lyrics.

View the best menswear looks at the red carpet of the 66th Annual Grammy Awards in the gallery below.

Landon Barker in ALEXANDER MCQUEEN.
Jon Batiste in VERSACE.
Mark Ronson in GUCCI.
Lil Mosey in LOUIS VUITTON.
Chris Appleton.
Peso Pluma.
Billy Strings in ALEXANDER MCQUEEN.
Noah Kahan in THOM SWEENEY.
Jake Pedersen.
Peter 'Lostboy' Rycroft.
Ed Sheeran.
Luis Figueroa in H. LORENZO.
Calvin Harris.
Dom Dolla in SAINT LAURENT.
21 Savage.
Tainy.
John Legend in SAINT LAURENT.
Jacob Collier in OTT.
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