Nostalagia hit the runway at the Burberry Winter 2024 show. Not only was the show's soundtrack a selection of Amy Winehouse's songs—"You Know I'm No Good", "In My Bed", "Half Time", and "Back to Black"—the show was opened by Agnyess Deyn. And if you were in your teens in the 2000s like me, Deyn would be a familiar name and figure—an English model known for her platinum blonde pixie cut and a fashion inspiration for girls and boys of the time.

The fashion served a similar platter of nostalgia. Chief creative officer Daniel Lee refocused his attention towards the military heritage of Burberry for the Winter 2024 collection with a colour palette that captured the earthy tones of the outdoors. Now that the new brand signifiers have been put in place—the Equestrian Knight Design, the Burberry knight blue and key bags emblematic of Lee's creative direction—its the coats that were reworked with a further military slant.

The fit: Trench coats took on new forms both in silhouette as well as the way they were worn. Instead of belting to accentuate the waist, the belt was tied from the back for a more minimal front. The collar was turned up and buttoned up to create a funnel neck (practical for the colder seasons). The trench coats were also dressed with the oversized epaulettes that were first introduced in Lee's debut collection for Burberry, as well as new keyring hardware that zipped up the front of the coat to the storm flap. The latter an example of Lee's penchant for decorative hardware at Burberry.

There was a decidedly oversized silhouette employed throughout the collection, exuding a sense of warmth and protection that Lee intended. But also, an extension of a signature British aesthetic prevalent on the streets.

Duffle coats and field jackets took on more voluminous forms as they were either crafted from fleecy wool or trimmed with a burst of braided fringing. Zippers on these outerwear were extended to trousers too, with each side consisting of three zipper pulls to allow for creative manipulation. They're reminiscent of those trackpants lined with buttons along the sides that were a big part of the noughties, but here, the attention was front and centre.

The details: On the bags front, a variation of the Trench Tote bag seemed to be a key push. Constructed with zippered sides, they were available in a number of materials with the standout being the ones featuring the Burberry check. And if I'm being honest, a more superior version that the original. The Shield bag, on the other hand, received a more functional upgrade with an exterior compartment.

While the knight blue wasn't part of the colour palette, it wasn't completely stripped from the Burberry Winter 2024 collection—its Lee's coloured signifier for the brand, after all. With every step of each model, the colour peeked through from the soles of every footwear. Not that we need to be reminded of how much that colour is now a part of Burberry (there's a whole knight blue takeover of Harrods that's still going on), but perhaps it's one of those subliminal messaging cleverly employed.

Three exceptional looks: Look 7 had the makings of being the next go-to fit for every British renegade youth; the easy and comfort-first look 19 with that plush mustard vest; and look 48's moleskin trench that's cool in every way.

The takeaway: I'm inclined to say that this is the best Lee for Burberry collection yet.

View the full Burberry Winter 2024 collection in the gallery below.

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Burberry's Seongsu Rose pop-up as part of its Seoul edition of Burberry Streets.

A new collection by a newly installed creative is a big deal, especially when it’s coming out of a storied fashion brand like Burberry.

When chief creative officer Daniel Lee’s debut collection was shown earlier in February during London Fashion Week, there was no denying that Lee’s visual aesthetic for Burberry took a stark departure from his predecessor’s, for which the overall consensus had been that it lacked Britishness for a quintessentially British brand.

While Lee’s collection only began rolling out into boutiques and online in September (that’s a seven-month wait if you’re counting, granted select clientele were given early buying access), the brand had already been releasing campaign visuals progressively. It had been introducing a new Burberry visual vocabulary to act as a sort of palate cleanser before Lee’s vision physically materialised in its entirety. But visuals can only do so much, particularly at a time when people are inundated with a constant flow of them from every direction. And let’s face it, we’ve devolved to have such short attention spans that any clip over 30 seconds is likely to get scrolled past.

Enter Burberry Streets.

The entirety of the main Seongsu Rose pop-up was drenched with a rose-motif tarp.

The street takeover series was first launched in London for a week in September, coinciding with the Spring/Summer 2024 edition of London Fashion Week. Burberry was serious about the takeover and went as far as to partner up with Transport for London to allow it to temporarily rename Bond Street station to Burberry Street station, including recolouring the roundels in knight blue—Lee’s colour signifier for Burberry. At the same time, North London’s Norman’s cafe played host to a special Burberry menu, had its interiors refurbished with the new Burberry icons, and made its run around London via a food truck.

But that’s only the tip of it. Burberry Streets is conceived to be a travelling series of takeovers around the world, with Seoul and Shanghai as planned stops thus far.

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It was in Seoul that we bore witness to how the Burberry rose print and the revived Equestrian Knight Design (EKD)—two key visual elements of Lee’s first collection—peppered the entire city, especially along the hip Seongsu-dong. A precinct that used to house shoemakers and leather factories, Seongsu-dong is now considered one of Seoul’s artistic districts where galleries and cafes are found next to existing manufacturing hubs and warehouses. There’s a certain grittiness to the area, punctuated by colourful graffiti. The campaign saw Burberry Streets take over the space for an entire month, ending on 5 November.

Murals, billboards, flags and awnings featuring the Burberry rose print motif stretched across a 10-minute walk along Seongsu-dong. They seem to be presented at random. At one point, the motif sat right atop the sign for an operational leather workshop, while EKDs were spray-painted on roads. But they all pointed in the direction of three Burberry pop-ups.

Seongsu Shoe featured all of Daniel Lee's first collection of shoes for Burberry.
The water bottles seen on the Autumn/Winter 2023 runway had its own Seongsu Bottle pop-up.

The first (depending on where one set out) was at Seongsu Shoe that’s dedicated to all things footwear from the Winter 2023 collection. At the other end was the bright yellow Seongsu Bottle, featuring the colourful hot water bottle accessories that are emblematic of the collection. Both were planned as micro pop-ups to flank the main Seongsu Rose pop-up—a massive space drenched in tarp emblazoned with the rose motif. It was here that visitors got to experience Lee’s debut collection in its entirety. Imagined within a “Petal Maze” installation, the collection is segmented into categories—bags, shoes, menswear, womenswear, accessories and more—encouraging visitors to explore each English rose-inspired element of the installation to get better acquainted with the new Burberry.

To underscore the Britishness of the entire takeover, Burberry brought over Norman’s for a dedicated pop-up right next to Seongsu Rose, serving up an all-day selection of British classics. And of course, also introducing a sliver of Norman’s interior to those unfamiliar with it.

The beauty of the Seoul takeover lay in that it was a visual feast of all things Burberry under Lee, exuberantly integrated into its local surroundings. The rose motif and the EKD stood out, yes. Yet they felt like artwork that you would typically find at Seongsu-dong.

The interior of Seongsu Rose was imagined with rose-inspired elements.
Burberry brought over Norman's too.
It was essentially a maze meant for complete exploration of every facet of the collection.
Each area was segmented into the different categories that comprise the Autumn/Winter 2023 collection.

It certainly helped too that the opening event of Seoul’s Burberry Streets takeover was attended by a curated list of Korean celebrities and creative figures. Fans came in droves, armed with their mobile devices and some professional camera equipment as they readied themselves for appearances by the likes of Lee Dongwook, Lee Jongsuk, Seventeen’s Wonwoo, Burberry ambassadors Bright and Jun Ji-hyun, and of course, Lee himself.

Chief creative officer Daniel Lee.

Let’s just say, every photo taken by every single fan that evening would have included their favourite idol dressed in Lee’s Burberry and with the hard-to-miss rose motif in the background. Need we say more?

There was no doubt that Burberry chief creative officer Daniel Lee's first showing for the British brand was a stark departure from predecessor Riccardo Tisci's.

The debut—a collection that we're finally able to experience in boutiques now—was a return to Burberry's Britishness, replete with elements and motifs ripped from Lee's lived experiences as a Brit as well as from the brand's archives. The Burberry check was rendered at a slant and blown up (a simple but effective way of modernising the brand signifier) and the Equestrian Knight Design (EKD) revived as a complementary branding device.

For the Burberry Summer 2024 collection, Lee continued to reimagine the brand's heritage with an even more focused lens. Building a new visual vocabulary for a brand like Burberry is no mean feat. With the second runway collection, we're starting to see the fruits of that labour.

If the Winter 2024 collection was a foundational collection that at times may have seemed a bit chaotic—a mallard beanie and a cacophony of visuals ranging from roses to more mallards to the EKD—the Summer 2024 collection felt more intentional and evolved. Surprisingly, the latter was more subdued and less colourful than the debut. In fact, the 'knight blue' that Lee has adopted for Burberry was little to be seen on the runway.

The fit: The overall colour palette for the collection was relatively quite dark. Instead of knight blue, colours graduated from black to a dark green before branching off to richer hues.

Yet, at the same time, prints were a key focus of the collection. What appeared as though vintage scarf prints lifted from the Burberry archives were actually prints of metal hardware in the shape of a horse—part of the Knight bag introduced for Winter 2023—and chains. Similarly, a repeated motif of the clasp of the Rocking Horse bag too appeared as a print. Both prints adorned a number of ready-to-wear pieces, including a new take on the classic Burberry trench. Lee's intent was to reimagine the trench for the summer and that included making it more lightweight than ever—in look 47, the trench could be seen hung by the neck simply by a thin chain.

What I especially liked about Burberry Summer 2024 was how Lee doubled down on the brand's military past. And while that could have resulted in quite costume-y creations, the ready-to-wear looked simply at home. Epaulettes on shirting as well as outerwear extended well beyond the shoulder line, while the trench coats cut a sharp, regimental silhouette while still retaining a sense of modernity with a dropped waist and exaggerated belt.

The details: Lee may have kept the tailoring sharp but he injected off-kilter semblances in the styling as well as accessories. The collection's slip-ons for example (looks 41 and 45) were doused in rhinestones with the EKD fixed like one would a Crocs Jibbitz. Leather loafers were crafted with an extended leather buckle in the shape of the Burberry Shield bag and topped with the EKD. It's these constant details that help drive the message of the new subtle visual vocabulary of Lee's Burberry.

Three exceptional looks: The ease and simplicity of look 16's black fit embellished with cleverly printed trousers; look 23's printed coordinates that could easily be broken up into pieces that could stand on their own; and look 45's new take of dressed up casual in classic Christopher Bailey-era hues.

The takeaway: Burberry is back to being refined with doses of unexpected quirks—a truly Brit aesthetic.

View the full Burberry Summer 2024 runway collection in the gallery below.

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Next stop: Burberry Street

If the Riccardo Tisci-era saw Burberry taking over beach clubs with the TB Monogram, Daniel Lee’s appears to be more subdued and tastefully so. As part of the brand’s announced "Burberry Streets" takeover series, the British brand has kicked things off right at home during London Fashion Week. In partnership with Transport for London—the government body responsible for the transport network in London—Bond Street station has been completely transformed into Burberry Street, complete with signs rendered in Lee's knight blue hue. The takeover will last until 19 September 2023. “Burberry Streets” is set to be an immersive brand experience consisting of events and installations in cities around the world. The series will make its rounds in Seoul and Shanghai this October.

Balmain pieces stolen in Paris

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In what would be any fashion designer's foremost nightmare, Balmain creative director Olivier Rousteing revealed on Instagram that pieces from the house's upcoming Spring/Summer 2024 runway show have been stolen. "More than 50 Balmain pieces stolen," Rousteing says, expressing his anger and disappointment at the loss of the hard work by his team. With just 10 days to go to the show during Paris Fashion Week, it does seem like Rousteing and his team will have to, in his words, "work days and night" to ensure that everything turns out as planned.

adidas' latest with Craig Green

A new take on adidas' iconic Stan Smiths has been revealed, courtesy of British fashion designer Craig Green. The CG SPLIT STAN retains the original silhouette of the shoe save for the "splitting" right down the middle—a rubber protrusion that's seemingly inserted between the two segments. The new design has dropped in three monochromatic colourways: white, black, and khaki.

The adidas Originals and Craig Green CG SPLIT STAN sneakers are now available through the adidas App and online.

Stone Island's artistic endeavour

Stone Island is embarking on a multi-year partnership with Frieze. Starting with Frieze London 2023—happening this 11 to 15 October—the brand will be the Official Partner of Focus, a fixture dedicated to younger galleries at Frieze London, Los Angeles, New York, and Seoul. Participating emerging galleries of Focus will each receive a bursary from Stone Island amounting to 30 per cent of each exhibitor's stand fee (in addition to Frieze's ongoing subsidies) as well as overall amplification of Focus through a dedicated content series. Stone Island will also become the Official Partner of Frieze 91, the organisation's membership programme. Frieze 91 allows members so gain exclusive access to art and artists through curated experiences as well as members-only content and benefits.

A Moncler icon revisited

As part of Moncler's RE/ICONS series—an annual celebration of the brand's iconic achievements of the past while looking to the future—the brand has revived its 1954 Karakorum duvet jacket. Worn by climbers in 1954, the Moncler Karakorum is known for its unparalleled warmth as well as technical excellence. Just how excellent, you ask? Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli each wore the Moncler Karakorum while scaling K2 and becoming the very first people to reach the summit in 1954. For the RE/ICONS series, the Moncler Karakorum has been reenvisioned in three designs (with a range of colours) varying in length and fit.

Shiny, simmering, splendid

In Coach's latest campaign, Dove Cameron, Yanfei Song, Lil Buck, and newly appointed global ambassador Youngji Lee battle their inner demons. It might sound a bit too dark for a fashion campaign but the "demons" in question are doppelgängers criticising their choice of wearing the Coach Shine collection—a range of metallic and patent leather pieces. The individual duos battle it off in fast-paced choreography before the expressive selves eventually triumphs. Basically, no one should ever dull your shine, Coach Shine or not.

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